Cover image for Under the influence
Title:
Under the influence
Author:
Brown, Ian, 1963-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
England : DMC Publishing, [2003]

â„—2003
Physical Description:
1 audio disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Compact disc.
Language:
English
Contents:
Liquid swords / Genius-GZA -- Meaning of the 5% / Brand Nubian -- Man in the hills / Burning Spear -- Fade away / Junior Byles -- The complaint / Buju Banton -- (White man) In Hammersmith Palais / The Clash -- Mi God mi King / Papa Levi -- No other like Jah / Sizzla -- Fug / Cymande -- Time / Edwin Starr -- Take some time out for love / Isley Brothers -- War on the bullshit / Osiris -- Too late / Larry Williams and Johnny Guitar Watson -- Across 110th Street / Bobby Womack -- Lover / The De-Lites -- The original gospel harmonettes / Dorothy Love Coates.
Subject Term:
UPC:
689783000225
Format :
Music CD

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Summary

Summary

Ian Brown, after Morrissey the second Mancunian to helm a volume in DMC's Under the Influence series, may have seen Mozzer at a few Nosebleeds shows, but the two probably weren't crossing paths elsewhere -- certainly not at the Burning Spear shows Brown attended religiously in the late '70s and early '80s. At an opposite pole from Morrissey's very camp mix, this Under the Influence is a collection split primarily into songs on the polemical end of reggae (Burning Spear, Buju Banton, Junior Byles, Papa Levi) and the burning edge of the Northern soul nuggets that were most popular when he was a child (from Edwin Starr, Isley Brothers, and the De-Lites). Brown has a few interesting stories behind these tracks -- Cymande's "Fug" was apparently a favorite on the Stone Roses' preshow stereo -- but Under the Influence isn't a successful collection. It's certainly composed of fair tracks, but they're grouped largely by genre with little pacing evident. Most importantly of all, the simple aesthetic requirements of a transitional mix simply aren't met. Under the Influence may be interesting background material for fans of Brown's continually beguiling solo career, but it won't persuade any disinterested listeners. ~ John Bush