Cover image for Reflections
Title:
Reflections
Author:
Bannister, Jo.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First St. Martin's Minotaur edition.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Minotaur, 2003.
Physical Description:
268 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780312319380
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Popular Materials-Mystery
Searching...
Eden Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Grand Island Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Lackawanna Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Orchard Park Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Though Brodie Farrell runs a business called "Looking for Something?" she tries to avoid missing people cases. But she can't refuse when her friend in the police asks her to find the long-lost aunt of two girls after their mother is murdered and their father disappears. When an intruder breaks into the girls' home, Brodie must act quickly to save them from a dangerous, elusive murderer.


Author Notes

Jo Bannister was born in Rochdale, Lancashire, England, and resides in County Down, North Ireland. Bannister left school at sixteen and went to work for the County Down Spectator, eventually becoming its editor. She left the paper in 1988 to devote time to writing works of fiction.

Bannister is a noted mystery writer. Detective Chief Inspector Frank Shapiro, Detective Inspector Liz Graham, and Detective Seargent Cal Donovan make up a trio featured in a series of books including A Taste for Burning, Burning Desires, and A Bleeding of Innocents.

Her titles also include Flawed, From Fire and Flood, Closer Still, Fathers and Sins, and Liars All.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Spooky, sinister, and suspenseful, Bannister's latest is a stunning psychological thriller that will keep readers guessing from page one. When Serena Dawes is found brutally murdered, the evidence points to her husband, Robert, as the killer. Serena loved to taunt Robert by having torrid affairs with teenage boys, and the police figure the poor guy finally snapped. But the real tragedy is that, with Serena dead and Robert nowhere to be found, the two young Dawes girls may wind up in foster care. Cop Jack Deacon, in charge of the case, calls on his friend Brodie Farrell, finder extraordinaire, to track down Serena's sister Constance, who is the most likely candidate to provide a home for the kids. Brodie's friend Daniel is engaged to tutor the girls, and because he has experienced terrible tragedy in his own life, Brodie figures he'll be able to help the girls deal with their heartbreaking situation. But as Deacon investigates, he finds strange inconsistencies, and when Serena's former lover is nearly killed and Brodie and Daniel are locked in a burning building, Deacon knows he is up against more than he bargained for. White-knuckled suspense, startling twists, and a gut-wrenching climax make for an outstanding read. --Emily Melton Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Set in Northern Ireland, Bannister's third Brodie Farrell suspense novel (after 2002's True Witness) tells the emotionally draining tale of two sisters, 14-year-old Juanita and 11-year-old Emerald Daws, left alone in the world after their father allegedly murdered their mother in revenge for her frequent affairs with local teenagers. In the aftermath of the tragedy, the girls' uncle hires Brodie, who runs the search business "Looking for Something?," to find a missing relative to care for them. Brodie disappears for most of the story, leaving Juanita and Emerald in the custody of her friend, out-of-work teacher Daniel Hood, who soon becomes emotionally attached to his young charges, despite their intense hostility toward anyone older than themselves. Wracked with panic attacks from the misfortunes he suffered in True Witness, Daniel proves ineffective as both an instructor and investigator and is nearly killed several times before Brodie returns to help solve this sordid case. Suspense builds gradually in the uncomplicated plot, which at times could use clearer direction with fewer psychological digressions. Bannister's occasional use of Irish slang and syntax may confuse some readers. A tense final scene redeems an overly drawn-out resolution to a disturbing case of mayhem in the wilds of Ulster. (Dec. 8) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Google Preview