Cover image for Expressive!
Title:
Expressive!
Author:
Kuspit, Donald B. (Donald Burton), 1935-
Publication Information:
Ostfildern-Ruit : Hatje Cantz ; Riehen/Basel : Fondation Beyeler ; New York, N.Y. : Distribution in the U.S.A. by D.A.P., Distributed Art Publishers, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
207 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 31 cm
General Note:
"This volume is published to accompany the exhibition 'Expressive!' at the Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel, 30 March 2003 to 10 August 2003"--Colophon.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9783775713030

9783905632231
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6494.E9 E9 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The quality of expressiveness--an outcry of the human soul against the mechanization of life--runs like a red scar through the entire history of modern art and up to the present day. If expressionism is associated first and foremost with the German contribution to Modernism, evoking the artists associated with Die Brcke (Kirchner, Heckel and Nolde) and Der Blaue Reiter (Marc and Kandinsky), but also the Austrian Schiele and Kokoshka, and the Parisian fauves, it nevertheless goes further. Beginning with the fathers of expressionism, Gauguin, van Gogh and Munch, the most important inspirations for a movement laden with emotions and endowed with the furor of rebellion, the red scar bleeds through the expressive tendencies of the interwar artists (Beckmann, Soutine and Picasso) and the postwar artists (Dubuffet, de Kooning and Bacon), and all the way to neo-expressionism (Baselitz, Lpertz, Lassnig) and 80s neo-fauvism (Clemente, Basquiat and Disler), ending with Louise Bourgeois and Bruce Nauman. In accompanying essays, philosopher and art historian Donald Kuspit sets out to trace the meaning of the term "expressive"; curator Markus Brderlin explores expressionism by looking backwards from neo-expressionism; and numerous short texts round off the exploration by focusing on individual works of art.


Google Preview