Cover image for Antarctica
Title:
Antarctica
Author:
Questar, Inc.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
Chicago, IL : Distributed by Questar, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (168 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Program 1: The End of the Earth: Shows the fierce, remote, and astonishingly beautiful part of the earth. Look into the face of the Katabatic, the downward sloping wind that decimates life and dictates the weather. Then look at icebergs at the edge of the sea, these vast platforms of ice are the source of life for seals, whales, krill, penguins and petrels, but they also have a life of their own. Program 2: Under Antarctic Ice: Beneath the surface of stunningly cold water are an abundance of life forms and ice scapes. Hillary Swank narrates encounters with 30-foot tentacles, killer whales, and more in this fascinating look under the deep blue sea.
General Note:
Widescreen.

Double program. These programs were originally broadcast as part of the Nature series on PBS.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
English
Contents:
[Program 1.] Antarctica, the end of the earth -- [Program 2.] Under Antarctica ice.
Reading Level:
MPAA rating: not rated.
Added Uniform Title:
Nature (Television program)
Added Title:
Antarctica, the end of the earth.

Under Antarctic ice.
UPC:
033937034510
Format :
DVD

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G870 .A564 2003V Adult DVD Central Library
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Summary

Early explorers to Australia were astounded by the unusual animals, and felt that they were possibly the creations of another god. Even Darwin expressed these sentiments. Nature: Australia - A Separate Creation scrutinizes the marsupials, in particular kangaroos, whose distinctiveness is representative of Australia's strange creatures. The film discusses the development of marsupials from their origins as insect eaters in ancient forests to their achievement as the dominant mammal of the continent. Their species adapted most successfully to the changing environment of Australia. ~ Alice Day, Rovi