Cover image for A little princess : the story of Sara Crewe
Title:
A little princess : the story of Sara Crewe
Author:
Burnett, Frances Hodgson, 1849-1924.
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press, [2003]
Physical Description:
339 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin's London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786258420
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Juvenile Large Print Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Sara Crewe's privileged status at her boarding school ends when her father dies. Left penniless, Sara retains her pluck and optimism, which attract the notice of a mysterious benefactor.


Author Notes

Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote for children and adults, publishing both plays and novels. She was born in Manchester, England, on November 24, 1849. Her father, who owned a furniture store, died when she was only four years old. Her mother struggled to keep the family business running while trying to raise five children. Finally, because of the failing Manchester economy, the family sold the store and immigrated to the United States. In 1865 they settled just outside of Knoxville, Tennessee.

Hoping to offset her family's continuing financial troubles, Burnett began to submit her stories to women's magazines. She was immediately successful. In the late 1860s her stories were published in nearly every popular American magazine. Burnett helped to support her family with income from the sale of her stories, even saving enough to finance a trip back to England, where she stayed for over a year. In 1879, Burnett published her first stories for children; two of her most popular are A Little Princess and The Secret Garden.

In contrast to an extremely successful career, Burnett's personal life held many challenges. Her son Lionel was diagnosed with tuberculosis at age 15, from which he never recovered. His death inspired several stories about dead or dying children.

Burnett lived her later years on Long Island, New York. She died in 1924.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-7. Not just abridged but retold, this colorfully illustrated, large-format book has a text that's longer than most picture books but considerably shorter than Burnett's beloved novel. McClintock's sensitive illustrations, apparently ink drawings with watercolor washes, will certainly appeal to readers and book buyers of all ages. The period settings and costumes have a charm all their own, and the detailed pictures clearly portray Sara's transformation from privileged child to pauper and back again. Some scenes and dialogue here did not appear in the original book, but they serve to move the plot along more swiftly. The story loses a great deal of subtlety in theme and character development (as well as plot and setting) in its adaptation to picture-book format. Those who love the original will advise children to wait until they're old enough to read it. But children or parents who want a picture-book version will find this a very pretty one. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-This recording of Frances Hodgson Burnett's children's classic provides an entertaining and atmospheric introduction to the original. The abridgement allows for all the characters and their interactions to develop believably, but on occasion large chunks of time are unaccounted for. Lucy Whybrow narrates this version, and her clear rendition of Sara Crewe is a pleasure to listen to. Classical music adds to the enjoyment. Whybrow portrays the gently determined attitude, the sweet and charming manners, and the intelligent seriousness of this timeless heroine very well. With her father in India, Sara begins her life in England as a very rich boarder at Miss Minchin's school. When her father's business reverses and fatal illness leaves her an orphan and a pauper, Sara is determined to act as a princess in every way no matter how demeaned her situation. Whybrow captures her spirit, making this version a worthwhile addition to a collection that includes abridged versions of classics, perhaps as an inducement to young readers to try the original.-Jane P. Fenn, Corning-Painted Post West High School, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

A Little Princess My First Classics Chapter One Sara Once on a dark winter's day, when the yellow fog hung so thick and heavy in the streets of London that the lamps were lighted and the shop windows blazed with gas as they do at night, an odd-looking little girl sat in a cab with her father and was driven rather slowly through the big thoroughfares. She sat with her feet tucked under her, and leaned against her father, who held her in his arm, as she stared out of the window at the passing people with a queer old-fashioned thoughtfulness in her big eyes. She was such a little girl that one did not expect to see such a look on her small face. It would have been an old look for a child of twelve, and Sara Crewe was only seven. The fact was, however, that she was always dreaming and thinking odd things and could not herself remember any time when she had not been thinking things about grown-up people and the world they belonged to. She felt as if she had lived a long, long time. At this moment she was remembering the voyage she had just made from Bombay with her father, Captain Crewe. She was thinking of the big ship, of the Lascars passing silently to and fro on it, of the children playing about on the hot deck, and of some young officers' wives who used to try to make her talk to them and laugh at the things she said. Principally, she was thinking of what a queer thing it was that at one time one was in India in the blazing sun, and then in the middle of the ocean, and then driving in a strange vehicle through strange streets where the day was as dark as the night. She found this so puzzling that she moved closer to her father. "Papa," she said in a low, mysterious little voice which was almost a whisper, "papa." "What is it, darling?" Captain Crewe answered, holding her closer and looking down into her face. "What is Sara thinking of?" "Is this the place?" Sara whispered, cuddling still closer to him. "Is it, papa?" "Yes, little Sara, it is. We have reached it at last." And though she was only seven years old, she knew that he felt sad when he said it. It seemed to her many years since he had begun to prepare her mind for "the place," as she always called it. Her mother had died when she was born, so she had never known or missed her. Her young, handsome, rich, petting father seemed to be the only relation she had in the world. They had always played together and been fond of each other. She only knew he was rich because she had heard people say so when they thought she was not listening, and she had also heard them say that when she grew up she would be rich, too. She did not know all that being rich meant. She had always lived in a beautiful bungalow, and had been used to seeing many servants who made salaams to her and called her "Missee Sahib," and gave her her own way in everything. She had had toys and pets and an ayah who worshipped her, and she had gradually learned that people who were rich had these things. That, however, was all she knew about it. During her short life only one thing had troubled her, and that thing was "the place" she was to be taken to some day. The climate of India was very bad for children, and as soon as possible they were sent away from it -- generally to England and to school. She had seen other children go away, and had heard their fathers and mothers talk about the letters they received from them. She had known that she would be obliged to go also, and though sometimes her father's stories of the voyage and the new country had attracted her, she had been troubled by the thought that he could not stay with her. "Couldn't you go to that place with me, papa?" she had asked when she was five years old. "Couldn't you go to school, too? I would help you with your lessons." "But you will not have to stay for a very long time, little Sara " he had always said. "You will go to a nice house where there will be a lot of little girls, and you will play together, and I will send you plenty of books, and you will grow so fast that it will seem scarcely a year before you are big enough and clever enough to come back and take care of papa." She had liked to think of that. To keep the house for her father; to ride with him, and sit at the head of his table when he had dinner parties; to talk to him and read his books -- that would be what she would like most in the world and if one must go away to "the place" in England to attain it, she must make up her mind to go. She did not care very much for other little girls, but if she had plenty of books she could console herself. She liked books more than anything else, and was, in fact, always inventing stories of beautiful things and telling them to herself. Sometimes she had told them to her father, and he had liked them as much as she did. "Well, papa," she said softly, "if we are here I suppose we must be resigned." He laughed at her old-fashioned speech and kissed her. He was really not at all resigned himself, though he knew he must keep that a secret. His quaint little Sara had been a great companion to him, and he felt he should be a lonely fellow when, on his return to India... A Little Princess My First Classics . Copyright © by Frances Burnett. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from A Little Princess: The Story of Sara Crewe by Frances Hodgson Burnett All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

The Whole of the Story
1 Sara
2 A French Lesson
3 Ermengarde
4 Lottie
5 Becky
6 The Diamond-Mines
7 The Diamond-Mines Again
8 In the Attic
9 Melchisedec
10 The Indian Gentleman
11 Ram Dass
12 The Other Side of the Wall
13 One of the Populace
14 What Melchisedec Heard and Saw
15 The Magic
16 The Visitor
17 "It Is the Child!"
18 "I Tried Not to Be" 184
19 "Anne" 195

Google Preview