Cover image for Paranoia
Title:
Paranoia
Author:
Finder, Joseph.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First St. Martin's Press edition.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
426 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.5 19.0 107876.
ISBN:
9780312319144
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Adam Cassidy is twenty-six and a low level employee at a high-tech corporation who hates his job. When he manipulates the system to do something nice for a friend, he finds himself charged with a crime. Corporate Security gives him a choice: prison - or become a spy in the headquarters of their chief competitor, Trion Systems.They train him. They feed him inside information. Now, at Trion, he's a star, skyrocketing to the top. He finds he has talents he never knew he possessed. He's rich, drives a Porsche, lives in a fabulous apartment, and works directly for the CEO. He's dating the girl of his dreams.His life is perfect. And all he has to do to keep it that way is betray everyone he cares about and everything he believes in.But when he tries to break off from his controllers, he finds he's in way over his head, trapped in a world in which nothing is as it seems and no one can really be trusted.And then the real nightmare begins� From the writer whose novels have been called "thrilling" ( New York Times ) and "dazzling" ( USA Today ) comes an electrifying new novel, a roller-coaster ride of suspense that will hold the reader hostage until the final, astonishing twist.


Author Notes

Joseph Finder was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 6, 1958, and spent his early childhood in Afghanistan and the Philippines. He received a B.A. in Russian studies from Yale University and a M.A. at the Harvard Russian Research Center. He also served as a teaching fellow at Harvard from 1983-84.

His first book, Red Carpet: The Connection between the Kremlin and America's Most Powerful Businessmen, was published in 1983 and is a nonfiction account of Western capitalists making profits from trade with the communist world. His first novel, The Moscow Club, was published in 1991. His other novels include Extraordinary Powers, The Zero Hour, Paranoia, Power Play, and the Nick Heller series. Company Man won a the Barry and Gumshoe Awards for Best Thriller and Killer Instinct won the International Thriller Writers Award for Best Novel. High Crimes was adapted into a 2002 Fox film starring Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman.

Finder's novel, The Fixer, made The New York Times best seller list in 2015.

In addition to fiction, he writes on espionage and international relations for the New York Times, The Washington Post, and The New Republic.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Adam Cassidy, low-level employee of Wyatt Telecom, is bored. So he cracks the corporate accounts to give a nice old guy who works on the loading dock a retirement party to equal a board-of-directors bash. Threatened with embezzlement charges--the wingding cost $78,000--and worse by Wyatt's security chief, Adam starts to BS and so impresses Nick Wyatt, the company's SOB founder, that Wyatt makes an offer Adam can't refuse: be a spy at Wyatt's biggest competitor, Trion. It's a stretch becoming a credible young hotshot, but Adam gets well placed at Trion and soon becomes founder Jock Goddard's golden-boy advisor. All the while, he is moling through Trion's cyberguts to find out about a top-secret, earthshaking innovation that Wyatt wants to steal. In the upshot, nothing is what it seems, not even the babe, supposed to be deeply involved in Trion's hush-hush project, whom Adam gets involved with. Finder's last novel, High Crimes (1997), was filmed; he has sold this one to the movies, too, and, judging from its cute dialogue, cardboard characters, shopworn settings, hackneyed developments, and copious product placements, already written the screenplay. If this proves to be, as its hype hopes, the first blockbuster of 2004, surely it'll be nothing but a doorstopper by 2005. Acquire with caution. --Ray Olson Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Is it too early to declare Finder's fifth novel (after High Crimes) the most entertaining thriller of 2004? Probably, but it will be a surprise if another suspenser proves as much sheer fun as Finder's robust tale of corporate espionage. Narrator Adam Cassidy's trip to hell begins when he charges to the company an unauthorized, very expensive party for a retiring blue-collar laborer at their place of work, Wyatt Telecom. Caught, low-level staffer Adam is given an offer he can't refuse by monstrously slick and wealthy CEO Nick Wyatt: penetrate rival high-tech giant Trion Systems and get the goods on Trion's killer new products, or face a battery of felony charges. Adam accepts the deal, and days later he's at Trion, along with false credentials that persuade Trion that he was a key player at Wyatt Telecom, rather than a cube-squatting shlub. Finder presents Adam's thrust into Trion as the scary, grand adventure of a stranger in a strange land, as Adam must contend with a new corporate culture and a host of envious enemies, particularly once he's tapped to be Trion founder Jock Goddard's personal assistant. As Adam comes to admire, even to love, Jock, the demands by Wyatt for ever better intel grate all the more. But if Adam refuses, prison awaits, and anyway he loves his big new salary and perks, not to mention his new, lovely Trion bedmate. Adam's love/hate relationship with his bitter, dying dad and his fragmenting friendship with a pal he's left behind add texture to the relentless suspense, punctuated by tense cloak-and-dagger scenes as Adam steals secrets from his new bosses. A first-rate surprise ending packs a wallop. This novel is the real deal: a thriller that actually will keep readers up way past their bedtimes. (Jan. 20) Forecast: High Crimes, filmed with Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd, hit bestseller lists in mass market. With a major push from the publisher, including a five-city author tour, plus hot word of mouth, this novel should do the same in hardcover and has the potential to make Finder a household name. Rights sold in seven countries; simultaneous audiobooks from Audio Renaissance. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Adam Cassidy is a slacker who has screwed up big time. He's only a junior product-line manager at Wyatt Telecom, but he has embezzled what turns out to be a shocking $78,000. The money went to cover a retirement bash for a loading-dock foreman, to give him the same splurge that executives get. Adam hates his job, so he would not have minded being fired. Instead, he's threatened by Corporate Security with up to 20 years in a federal penitentiary unless he agrees to infiltrate their rival company-Trion Systems. With Wyatt backing him at every step, he's hired by Trion and soon finds himself an executive assistant to the CEO, a man who treats him like a son. Adam, whose own bitter father is dying of emphysema, is torn by ethical dilemmas as he takes ever-greater risks to penetrate the layers of security around Trion's latest project, the most important technological breakthrough since the integrated circuit. Don't start this book at 8:00 p.m. or you'll be up all night. Finder's (Zero Hour) latest is a fun read with a hip narrator, an engaging story set in a world rarely seen in thrillers, and great suspense. Highly recommended for all popular fiction collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 9/15/03.]-Ronnie H. Terpening, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Part One ***** The Fix Fix: A CIA term, of Cold War origin, that refers to a person who is to be compromised or blackmailed so that he will do the Agency's bidding. -The Dictionary of Espionage ***** Until the whole thing happened, I never believed the old line about how you should be careful what you wish for, because you might get it. I believe it now. I believe in all those cautionary proverbs now. I believe that pride goeth before a fall. I believe the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, that misfortune seldom comes alone, that all that glitters isn't gold, that lies walk on short legs. Man, you name it. I believe it. I could try to tell you that what started it all was an act of generosity, but that wouldn't be quite accurate. It was more like an act of stupidity. Call it a cry for help. Maybe more like a raised middle finger. Whatever, it was my bad. I half thought I'd get away with it, half expected to be fired. I've got to say, when I look back on how it all began, I marvel at what an arrogant prick I was. I'm not going to deny that I got what I deserved. It just wasn't what I expected-but who'd ever expect something like this? All I did was make a couple of phone calls. Impersonated the VP for Corporate Events and called the fancy outside caterer that did all of Wyatt Telecom's parties. I told them to just make it exactly like the bash they'd done the week before for the Top Salesman of the Year award. (Of course, I had no idea how lavish that was.) I gave them all the right disbursement numbers, authorized the transfer of funds in advance. The whole thing was surprisingly easy. The owner of Meals of Splendor told me he'd never done a function on a company loading dock, that it presented "decor challenges," but I knew he wasn't going to turn away a big check from Wyatt Telecom. Somehow I doubt Meals of Splendor had ever done a retirement party for an assistant foreman either. I think that's what really pissed Wyatt off. Paying for Jonesie's retirement party-a loading dock 0guy, for Christ's sake!-was a violation of the natural order. If instead I'd used the money as a down payment on a Ferrari 360 Modena convertible, Nicholas Wyatt might have almost understood. He would have recognized my greed as evidence of our shared humanity, like a weakness for booze, or "broads," as he called women. If I'd known how it would all end up, would I have done it all over again? Hell, no. Still, I have to say, it was pretty cool. I was into the fact that Jonesie's party was being paid for out of a fund earmarked for, among other things, an "offsite" for the CEO and his senior vice presidents at the Guanahani resort on the island of St. Barthelemy. I also loved seeing the loading dock guys finally getting a taste of how the execs lived. Most of the guys and their wives, whose idea of a splurge was the Shrimp Feast at the Red Lobster or Ribs On The Barbie at Outback Steakhouse, didn't know what to make of some of the weird food, the osetra caviar and saddle of veal Provencal, but they devoured the filet of beef en croute, the rack of lamb, the roasted lobster with ravioli. The ice sculptures were a big hit. The Dom Perignon flowed, though not as fast as the Budweiser. (This I called right, since I used to hang out on the loading dock on Friday afternoons, smoking, when someone, usually Jonesie or Jimmy Connolly, the foreman, brought in an Igloo of cold ones to celebrate the end of another week.) Jonesie, an old guy with one of those weathered, hangdog faces that make people like him instantly, was lit the whole night. His wife of forty-two years, Esther, at first seemed standoffish, but she turned out to be an amazing dancer. I'd hired an excellent Jamaican reggae group, and everyone got into it, even the guys you'd never expect to dance. This was after the big tech meltdown, of course, and companies everywhere were laying people off and instituting "frugality" policies, meaning you had to pay for the lousy coffee, and no more free Cokes in the break room, and like that. Jonesie was slated to just stop work one Friday, spend a few hours at HR signing forms, and go home for the rest of his life, no party, no nothing. Meanwhile, the Wyatt Telecom E-staff was planning to head down to St. Bart's in their Learjets, boink their wives or girlfriends in their private villas, slather coconut oil on their love handles, and discuss company-wide frugality policies over obscene buffet breakfasts of papayas and hummingbird tongues. Jonesie and his friends didn't really question too closely who was paying for it all. But it did give me some kind of twisted secret pleasure. Until around one-thirty in the morning, when the sound of electric guitars and the screams of a couple of the younger guys, blotto out of their minds, must have attracted the curiosity of a security guard, a fairly new hire (the pay's lousy, turnover is unbelievable) who didn't know any of us and wasn't inclined to cut anyone any slack. He was a pudgy guy with a flushed, sort of Porky Pig face, barely thirty. He just gripped his walkie-talkie as if it were a Glock and said, "What the hell?" And my life as I knew it was over. Copyright 2004 by Joseph Finder Excerpted from Paranoia by Joseph Finder All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.