Cover image for Death by Hollywood : a novel
Title:
Death by Hollywood : a novel
Author:
Bochco, Steven, 1943-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First large print edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Random House Large Print, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
342 pages (large print) ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780375432989
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library LARGE PRINT Adult Large Print Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

The debut novel by the Emmy Award(-winning creator of "NYPD Blue" is a suspenseful, darkly comic crime novel about a Hollywood writer who witnesses a murder, and insinuates himself into the investigation in order to write a screenplay about it.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Some stories segue seamlessly into audio form while others are at their most compelling in book form. This gritty debut novel from Bochco, the co-creator of TV shows Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law and NYPD Blue, lands squarely in the latter category. Bochco's tale of frustration, vanity and murder in Hollywood may be a slick, entertaining beach read, but unsuspecting readers who pop this audio adaptation into their cassette deck may feel slightly queasy by the end of the first tape. Franz's leering rendition of the book's countless obscenities and sex scenes manages to transform this material from raw to plain old raunchy. It can be difficult to distinguish one male voice from the next, but, worst of all, Franz's handling of Bochco's already two-dimensional women leaves them simpering and flat. At the very least, this is an audio book to listen to in complete privacy. The combination of off-color language and Franz's lascivious delivery would be better suited for a bachelor party than a wholesome family car trip. Simultaneous release with the Random hardcover (Forecasts, July 28). (Sept.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.


Excerpts

Excerpts

CHAPTER 1 There used to be a writer by the name of merle Miller, who wrote that people in Hollywood are always touching you--not because they like you, but because they want to see how soft you are before they eat you alive. He was right. It's a tough town and a tough business, and if you don't watch your step, either one'll kill you, which I guess is what this story is actually about. By way of formal introduction, my name is Eddie Jelko, and I'm an agent. I represent screenwriters, primarily, and a few important directors. I used to represent actors when I first started in the business almost twenty years ago, but it didn't take me long to figure out that actors are crazy. They tend to be paranoid, narcissistic, and, in general, oblivious to the needs and feelings of others. The good news is, they can also be charming, seductive, charismatic, and, in the case of the very few, so genuinely gifted that simply being in their presence is a privilege. That said, celebrity, for the ego-challenged, can be as destructive as heroin. A little is too much, as they say, and too much is never enough. In my naïveté, I thought writers and directors would be different. Fat chance. They're just as loony. In fact, the entertainment industry as a whole is one giant dysfunctional family. Everyone's terrified--of their own failure, or of everyone else's success--and as a general rule, you can assume that everyone lies about everything. (Have you ever looked at an actor's résumé--at the bottom, under special skills? Speaks three languages. Black belt in martial arts. Rides horses and motorcycles. Juggling and acrobatics. The truth is, you're lucky if they can drive a fucking car.) And agents? By and large, we're nothing more than well-paid pimps who represent our pooched-out clients as if they're beautiful young virgins, offering them up to a bunch of jaded johns who know better, but these are the only whores in town. As the saying goes, denial is not a river in Egypt. It's a river in Hollywood, and it runs deep, and brown. The story I want to tell you involves, among other things, a screenwriter whose career is fading out more than it's fading in, a billionaire's wife, and a murder--which means, of course, there's also a cop. Plus, the story has one other thing going for it. It's true. Would I lie to you? From the Hardcover edition. Excerpted from Death by Hollywood by Steven Bochco All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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