Cover image for This little piggy's book of manners
Title:
This little piggy's book of manners
Author:
Allen, Kathryn Madeline.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : H. Holt, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Some little pigs remember their manners and others do not.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.6 0.5 74246.
Added Author:
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hol031/2002010858.html
ISBN:
9780805067699
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"This little piggy said 'please' and 'thank you.' This little piggy did not. This little piggy closed his mouth while he ate. This little piggy forgot. Oops!Just like little piggies, it's easy for young children to sometimes forget their manners. Here's a jaunty picture book that will make the learning experience all the more fun.


Author Notes

Kathryn Madeline Allen is the author of numerous short stories and poems for children. She lives in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, with her three children, who always remember their manners (well, most of the time). Nancy Wolff is a firm believer in never talking with your mouth full. Her illustrations have appeared on almost every imaginable surface, including magazines, book covers, juice boxes, journals, calendars, pens, plates, greeting cards, and much more. This is her first book for children. She lives in New York City.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. In this clever tale of etiquette and edification, piggish behavior takes on new meaning. Like Karen Katz's No Biting!0 (2002) and Martine Agassi's Hands Are Not for Hitting 0 (2000), Piggy0 gives behavioral cues to little ones still focused on their own worldview and parents fighting the good fight in the war on rude behavior. Comparing the boorish attitude of one pig to the polite demeanor of another, the lesson continually reinforced is positive feedback comes from positive behavior. From the sharing of toys to sloppy table manners (called "utterly disgusting" by a bovine dining companion), the book draws upon situations that will be very familiar to youngsters. The biggest drawback of this fun, funny frolic is that the exemplary manners of the proper porker don't hold a candle to the laugh-out-loud antics of the socially impaired piglet--the one sure to leave a lasting impression on a giggly target audience. Wolff's signature four-legged friends lend a hip, contemporary edge to this swine-time tale. --Terry Glover Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

First-time author Allen transforms the classic toe-wiggling rhyme into a pig-centric do's-and-don'ts etiquette lesson, covering such subjects as table manners, waiting one's turn and cleaning up after oneself. "This little piggy... closed his mouth while he ate," she writes, as debut illustrator Wolff (who also provides the distinctive hand-lettered texts) portrays the pig's tablemates as awed by his finesse. "I could watch that pig chew all day," reads the thought balloon of an adjacent rabbit, while a zebra dreams, "I'd love to see him tackle a corn on the cob." But on the page that follows, "this little piggy forgot"-and not only are the contents of his mouth clearly visible, but the wall and table are splattered with food, grossing out his dining companions. "I've lost my appetite," thinks a fox. Allen also makes the point that good manners are a matter not just of consideration for others but of self-interest as well-when a piggy politely admires a wolf's teeth, the predator is so pleased that he decides not to eat him after all. However, the perky tone cannot completely disguise the pedantry. Wolff's ink-and-gouache pictures, on the other hand, can be too much of good thing. Overflowing with colors, characters, textures (including painted newsprint) and textual asides, they seem to lack a focal point and thus keep readers at a distance. Ages 2-6. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Fresh and funny illustrations in an eye-popping array of bright hues enliven brief, understated pairings of good and poor behavior choices. For example, "This little piggy- put her playthings away./This little piggy pouted./This little piggy- spoke kindly to others./This little piggy shouted." These lessons are miles from the dull and didactic, though, as readers follow an engaging animal cast peppered with close-ups of pink piggies in humorous situations. Word balloons show a polite piggy complimenting a wolf on his beautiful teeth, while the wolf thinks, "I guess I won't eat him." Clever use of the page shows a shouting piggy with an enormous stream of words coming out of her mouth, the force of which knocks down animals in its wake. Generous use of bright red, electric blue, and school-bus yellow adds to the fun. Teachers encouraging young children to help create positive group experiences will welcome this lively addition.-Faith Brautigam, Gail Borden Public Library, Elgin, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.