Cover image for The Alzheimer's health care handbook : how to get the best medical care for your relative with Alzheimer's Disease, in and out of the hospital
Title:
The Alzheimer's health care handbook : how to get the best medical care for your relative with Alzheimer's Disease, in and out of the hospital
Author:
Mittelman, Mary S.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Marlowe & Co., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xii, 196 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781569244456
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RC523.2 .M58 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Clearfield Library RC523.2 .M58 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library RC523.2 .M58 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Williamsville Library RC523.2 .M58 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library RC523.2 .M58 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The health care of a family member with Alzheimer's disease--from routine doctors' visits to hospitalization and recovery--can prove daunting for even the most knowledgeable and dedicated caregiver. How to Get the Best Medical Care for Your Relative with Alzheimer's Disease offers readers clear explanations and sensitive advice about how to meet the needs of their loved ones with Alzheimer's both inside and outside of a hospital--and meet their own needs as well. Mittelman and Epstein draw on both professional knowledge and personal experience: In addition to their notable medical and research backgrounds, both authors have cared for a parent with dementia. How to Get the Best Medical Care for Your Relative with Alzheimer's Disease is a valuable resource with specific, practical, and sensitive advice not only for family members, but also for health-care providers and all others involved in the care of the growing population of Alzheimer's patients.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

The healthcare system is not geared to treating patients with memory disorders who also suffer from physical ailments, write Mittelman, a psychiatry professor and director of psychosocial research and support at the NYU Silberstein Institute of Aging and Dementia Research, and Epstein, a social worker and private counselor at the NYU Aging and Dementia Center. Their readable guide offers a wealth of useful advice for caregivers on such essential topics as choosing a primary-care physician, preparing the individual with memory loss for a doctor's appointment, coping with emergencies and emergency room treatments, making decisions about treatment options and end-of-life care, and acting as an advocate for an ill family member. The authors devote much of their book to coping with hospitalizations that often worsen dementia symptoms even in people with mild memory loss and includes practical ways to reassure and help the ill person deal with unfamiliar routines, surroundings, and procedures. Each chapter includes short case histories and brief glossaries. In the appendix, readers will find a "Profile of a Person with Memory Impairment," a form that documents essential insurance and medical information, emergency contacts, and a list of behaviors the individual may exhibit because of memory loss. Much of the excellent information here is not available elsewhere, making this an essential addition to consumer health collections. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview