Cover image for Marijuana : what's a parent to believe?
Title:
Marijuana : what's a parent to believe?
Author:
Cermak, Timmen L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Center City, Minn. : Hazelden, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
x, 253 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781592850396
Format :
Book

Available:*

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HV5822.M3 C395 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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HV5822.M3 C395 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HV5822.M3 C395 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

As a parent, if you're not sure what to believe about marijuana, how will you handle the subject with your child? Maybe you smoked pot as a teen, or you use marijuana today. Maybe you never tried pot, or you don't even know what it looks like. Maybe you're simply confused over conflicting claims about the drug whether it's addictive, how harmful it is, why some think it should be legalized. The best way for you to help your teen make healthy choices is to be informed. This much-needed bookabout America's most widely used illegal drug helps parents sort through the latest facts, the known risks, and the divergent perspectives on pot. The basic message? For teens, marijuana use equals risk. Your basic message? That's up to you.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

These three titles update conventional knowledge about teens and drugs. In Teens Under the Influence, Ketcham, coauthor of Under the Influence, a best seller that exploded myths about alcoholism, and Pace, former chair of the New York State Governor's Advisory Committee on Alcoholism, define the magnitude of the teenage drug problem-which is huge-and offer a wealth of information. After showing us that so many kids are users (with anecdotes from them), the authors dedicate ten chapters to ten drugs, from alcohol and Ecstasy to cocaine and Ritalin, describing who's using them and why, short- and long-term effects, symptoms of use, dependence, and more. The final pages let parents see the problem and get help. As the most current and comprehensive resource on the teen drug problem, this will find an audience with teens, parents, and professionals. Highly recommended. Alcohol and Marijuana, the first two entries in a new series, come from the Hazelden Foundation, a leader in chemical dependency education and treatment. Both bring new findings to traditional ways of understanding these drugs. In Marijuana, Cermak (director, California Soc. of Addiction Medicine Task Force) describes the world of difference between experimenting with marijuana at age 12 and age 20. Rejecting the "just say no" approach, as well as the legalization model, he urges schools to adopt programs that will teach kids social and emotional competence, not just drug education (in most cases, they already know a lot about drugs, yet they're willing to try them). Pot, Cermak says, wreaks havoc on adolescents and their families. Incarceration is not the answer; marijuana dependence is a disease like alcoholism, not a crime like murder. In Alcohol, Biddulph, an adolescent therapist and addiction counselor, rejects the idea that underage drinking is so common that parents should overlook it. There is no such thing as responsible teenage drinking, he states; it is against the law and can lead to alcohol dependence. Like Marijuana, Alcohol provides 21st-century research to help parents define what's permissible and what's not. Though marred by dimestore cover art, the Hazelden titles will make excellent additions to public and school libraries that need brief profiles of certain drugs and their teen users. They are more current and thorough than Enslow's "Drug and Library" series and less sensational than that publisher's "Hot Issues" series.-Linda Beck, Indian Valley P.L., Telford, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

from Chapter 4Why Teens Begin Using Marijuana: The Seductive Power of Pot Have you ever wanted to just get out from underneath all the pressures weighing on you, to stop the world for a few hours, to get away from the routine of who you have become, and to dream about what life could be? Have you ever wearied of having to take life's responsibilities so seriously, wanted to lighten up, take the afternoon off, laugh at your cares? Or are there times you wish you could be a little bad, let loose, and say the hell with trying to do what's right all the time, bend the rules, take some risks? Perhaps more important, have you longed for greater mystery in your life, a deeper curiosity about your connection to the infinite, even a spiritual transformation? I certainly have felt all these things, and they help me relate to why many teens are attracted to experimenting with marijuana and drugs in general. As adults, we are under a constant barrage of "answers" to these longings: buy a lottery ticket, take a vacation, drive a sporty car, be sexy, order this brand of beer, catch the right mate, take yoga. The quick fixes are alluring, but superficial, and even adults are not always prepared to deal with all the marketing that touts easy answers. The longings are very real, and most of us are familiar with how much power they have. To understand why teens begin to play with pot, we need to understand that they have the same longings, without the experience to help them steer away from easy answers. Underneath these longings are a host of motivations, most of which are completely natural. Curiosity as a Fundamental Motivation Adolescence is a time of tremendous change. Too often, adults and teens think the primary task of adolescence is separation. Many consider adolescent rebellion to be a necessary part of the separation process. Indeed, there is a need for teens to begin loosening the connections between themselves and their parents. But this separation is not the most important change required. Adolescence is also a time for forming new connections to one's peers, to the world outside family, to one's sexuality, to the deeper experience of self coming into awareness, and to one's innate spiritual longings. Separation from family is necessary primarily to open up space for all the new connections teens must forge. Curiosity fuels the drive to find new relationships and to experience the world beyond the confines of home. Adolescence is life's first really conscious voyage of discovery. Teens are aware that they are on a profoundly important voyage, and this conscious awareness helps in guiding the voyage. Some are terrified and try to remain moored to their home dock as long as possible. Others are cautious and take several short cruises first before striking out for more distant ports. Some respond to the challenge and sail out directly to find their fate, while others are so thrilled by the adventure lying just over the horizon that they ch Excerpted from Marijuana - What's a Parent to Believe?: What's a Parent to Believe? by Timmen L. Cermak All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.