Cover image for MX : prescription for disaster
Title:
MX : prescription for disaster
Author:
Scoville, Herbert.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, [1981]

©1981
Physical Description:
xi, 231 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780262191999

9780262690775
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library UG1312.I2 S36 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The MX missile system requires the placement of intercontinental ballistic missiles, each equipped with ten nuclear warheads, in constantly shifting patterns of underground deployment at sites that occupy vast tracts of land. This is a strategem for disaster, Herbert Scoville argues. "The scale of the MX deployment program almost defies comprehension. It can only be described by using the superlative case--the most expensive, the most everything, except effective. In this book Scoville, President of the Arms Control Association and formerly a senior official in the Central Intelligence Agency, reveals the MX to be an unnecessary and extraordinarily expensive project that will not fufill its original intent. He points out that land-based missiles will still be vulnerable to attack and may actually increase the risk of such an attack, since the MX will lead to a new and accelerated arms race. Scoville presents the history of the MX system from the Carter to Reagan administrations. He describes security implications and the future of nuclear arms control; the cost in dollars, resources, and local social and environmental impact; and alternatives to the MX system through arms limitation or sea-basing.


Summary

An analysis of the MX missile system and its flaws.

The MX missile system requires the placement of intercontinental ballistic missiles, each equipped with ten nuclear warheads, in constantly shifting patterns of underground deployment at sites that occupy vast tracts of land. This is a strategem for disaster, Herbert Scoville argues. "The scale of the MX deployment program almost defies comprehension. It can only be described by using the superlative case--the most expensive, the most everything, except effective. In this book Scoville, President of the Arms Control Association and formerly a senior official in the Central Intelligence Agency, reveals the MX to be an unnecessary and extraordinarily expensive project that will not fufill its original intent. He points out that land-based missiles will still be vulnerable to attack and may actually increase the risk of such an attack, since the MX will lead to a new and accelerated arms race. Scoville presents the history of the MX system from the Carter to Reagan administrations. He describes security implications and the future of nuclear arms control; the cost in dollars, resources, and local social and environmental impact; and alternatives to the MX system through arms limitation or sea-basing.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
1 The MX and Nuclear Warp. 1
I The MX Missile System
2 Objectivesp. 7
3 The MX Missilep. 12
4 The Basing Modep. 18
II The MX Decisions of 1979
5 Realities of Nuclear Warp. 35
6 Prevention, Yes
Nuclear War Fighting, Nop. 51
7 The Growth of Strategic Forcesp. 59
8 U.S.--U.S.S.R. Strategic Balancep. 71
9 SALT and the MXp. 89
10 The 1979 Decisionsp. 99
11 The MX Decision and the 1980 Electionp. 110
III Security and the MX
12 Survivabilityp. 121
13 The Risk of Nuclear Warp. 139
14 Implications for Nuclear Arms Controlp. 149
IV The Costs of the MX
15 Dollars and Resourcesp. 161
16 Regional Impactsp. 169
V Alternatives to the MX
17 A Sea-Based Alternativep. 195
18 Limiting the Threatp. 213
Glossaryp. 219
Indexp. 227
Prefacep. ix
1 The MX and Nuclear Warp. 1
I The MX Missile System
2 Objectivesp. 7
3 The MX Missilep. 12
4 The Basing Modep. 18
II The MX Decisions of 1979
5 Realities of Nuclear Warp. 35
6 Prevention, Yes
Nuclear War Fighting, Nop. 51
7 The Growth of Strategic Forcesp. 59
8 U.S.--U.S.S.R. Strategic Balancep. 71
9 SALT and the MXp. 89
10 The 1979 Decisionsp. 99
11 The MX Decision and the 1980 Electionp. 110
III Security and the MX
12 Survivabilityp. 121
13 The Risk of Nuclear Warp. 139
14 Implications for Nuclear Arms Controlp. 149
IV The Costs of the MX
15 Dollars and Resourcesp. 161
16 Regional Impactsp. 169
V Alternatives to the MX
17 A Sea-Based Alternativep. 195
18 Limiting the Threatp. 213
Glossaryp. 219
Indexp. 227

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