Cover image for Twenty thousand roads : women, movement, and the West
Title:
Twenty thousand roads : women, movement, and the West
Author:
Scharff, Virginia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley : University of California Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xi, 239 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Seeking Sacagawea -- The hearth of darkness: Susan Magoffin on suspect terrain -- Empire, liberty, and legend: woman suffrage in Wyoming -- Marking Wyoming: Grace Raymond Hebard and the west as woman's place -- "So many miles to a person": Fabiola Cabeza de Baca makes New Mexico -- Resisting arrest: Jo Ann Robinson and the power to move -- The long strange trip of Pamela des Barres -- They paved paradise.
Electronic Access:
Book review (H-Net) http://www.h-net.org/review/hrev-a0c9u1-aa
ISBN:
9780520212121

9780520237773
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library F596 .S26 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

From Sacagawea's travels with Lewis and Clark to rock groupie Pamela Des Barres's California trips, women have moved across the American West with profound consequences for the people and places they encounter. Virginia Scharff revisits a grand theme of United States history--our restless, relentless westward movement--but sets out in new directions, following women's trails from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth centuries. In colorful, spirited stories, she weaves a lyrical reconsideration of the processes that created, gave meaning to, and ultimately shattered the West.

Twenty Thousand Roads introduces a cast of women mapping the world on their own terms, often crossing political and cultural boundaries defined by male-dominated institutions and perceptions. Scharff examines the faint traces left by Sacagawea and revisits Susan Magoffin's famed honeymoon journey down the Santa Fe Trail. We also meet educated women like historian Grace Hebard and government extension agent Fabiola Cabeza de Baca, who mapped the West with different voyages and visions. Scharff introduces women whose lives gave shape to the forces of gender, race, region, and modernity; participants in exploration, war, politics, empire, and struggles for social justice; and movers and shakers of everyday family life.

This book powerfully and poetically shows us that to understand the American West, we must examine the lives of women who both built and resisted American expansion. Scharff remaps western history as she reveals how moving women have shaped our past, present, and future.


Summary

From Sacagawea's travels with Lewis and Clark to rock groupie Pamela Des Barres's California trips, women have moved across the American West with profound consequences for the people and places they encounter. Virginia Scharff revisits a grand theme of United States history--our restless, relentless westward movement--but sets out in new directions, following women's trails from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth centuries. In colorful, spirited stories, she weaves a lyrical reconsideration of the processes that created, gave meaning to, and ultimately shattered the West.

Twenty Thousand Roads introduces a cast of women mapping the world on their own terms, often crossing political and cultural boundaries defined by male-dominated institutions and perceptions. Scharff examines the faint traces left by Sacagawea and revisits Susan Magoffin's famed honeymoon journey down the Santa Fe Trail. We also meet educated women like historian Grace Hebard and government extension agent Fabiola Cabeza de Baca, who mapped the West with different voyages and visions. Scharff introduces women whose lives gave shape to the forces of gender, race, region, and modernity; participants in exploration, war, politics, empire, and struggles for social justice; and movers and shakers of everyday family life.

This book powerfully and poetically shows us that to understand the American West, we must examine the lives of women who both built and resisted American expansion. Scharff remaps western history as she reveals how moving women have shaped our past, present, and future.


Author Notes

Virginia Scharff is Professor of History at the University of New Mexico


Virginia Scharff is Professor of History at the University of New Mexico


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

These essays tell the stories of women who traversed the West on their own terms over two centuries and who made connections that they considered important rather than following precedents established by men. Scharff (history, Univ. of New Mexico; Brown-Eyed Girl) considers this independence to be an important element in the shaping of the West and the nation as a whole. To illustrate how women helped either to build or to resist westward expansion, she examines the lives of five women, from Lewis and Clark's Shoshone guide Sacajawea and Susan Magoffin, who traversed the Santa Fe Trail, all the way down to rock groupie Pamela Des Barres and her more recent arrival in California. While only specialists in women's studies and the history of the American West will fully appreciate how all these essays fit into theoretical frameworks, general readers and undergraduates will find the essays on women's suffrage in Wyoming and Grace Hebard's role there to be especially useful. For larger academic libraries.-Stephen H. Peters, Northern Michigan Univ. Lib., Marquette (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

In an original and insightful book, Scharff (Univ. of New Mexico) reinterprets familiar texts to present stories of women in motion in the American West. Before the term "West" was a construct, Sacagawea and Susan Magoffin traveled through its landscapes: Sacagawea, first a captive, then a guide, and perhaps later a fugitive; Magoffin, wife of a trader in New Mexico during the American conquest. Women on the move include Wyoming women, enfranchised in 1869 by state legislators who wanted to attract white settlers. They served on juries, ran for office, and became justices of the peace and university professors. Using her position as an itinerant home extension agent, Fabiola Cabeza de Baca secured a place in the West for its Spanish and Indian heritage. In the 1950s, Jo Ann Robinson used her own car as a tool to improve the mobility of bus-riding women in the South, and took herself to the urban West. In the 1960s, groupies like Pamela Des Barres moved through uncharted space to challenge social mores. Fans of the American West and women's history will relish this work of sophisticated cultural analysis. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/collections. P. W. Kaufman University of Southern Maine


Library Journal Review

These essays tell the stories of women who traversed the West on their own terms over two centuries and who made connections that they considered important rather than following precedents established by men. Scharff (history, Univ. of New Mexico; Brown-Eyed Girl) considers this independence to be an important element in the shaping of the West and the nation as a whole. To illustrate how women helped either to build or to resist westward expansion, she examines the lives of five women, from Lewis and Clark's Shoshone guide Sacajawea and Susan Magoffin, who traversed the Santa Fe Trail, all the way down to rock groupie Pamela Des Barres and her more recent arrival in California. While only specialists in women's studies and the history of the American West will fully appreciate how all these essays fit into theoretical frameworks, general readers and undergraduates will find the essays on women's suffrage in Wyoming and Grace Hebard's role there to be especially useful. For larger academic libraries.-Stephen H. Peters, Northern Michigan Univ. Lib., Marquette (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

In an original and insightful book, Scharff (Univ. of New Mexico) reinterprets familiar texts to present stories of women in motion in the American West. Before the term "West" was a construct, Sacagawea and Susan Magoffin traveled through its landscapes: Sacagawea, first a captive, then a guide, and perhaps later a fugitive; Magoffin, wife of a trader in New Mexico during the American conquest. Women on the move include Wyoming women, enfranchised in 1869 by state legislators who wanted to attract white settlers. They served on juries, ran for office, and became justices of the peace and university professors. Using her position as an itinerant home extension agent, Fabiola Cabeza de Baca secured a place in the West for its Spanish and Indian heritage. In the 1950s, Jo Ann Robinson used her own car as a tool to improve the mobility of bus-riding women in the South, and took herself to the urban West. In the 1960s, groupies like Pamela Des Barres moved through uncharted space to challenge social mores. Fans of the American West and women's history will relish this work of sophisticated cultural analysis. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/collections. P. W. Kaufman University of Southern Maine


Table of Contents

Acknolwedgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Part 1 Before the West
1. Seeking Sacagaweap. 11
2. The Hearth of Darkness: Susan Magoffin on Suspect Terrainp. 35
Part 2 In the West
3. Empire, Liberty, and Legend: Woman Suffrage in Wyomingp. 67
4. Marking Wyoming: Grace Raymond Hebard and the West as Woman's Placep. 93
5. "So Many Miles to a Person": Fabiola Cabeza de Baca Makes New Mexicop. 115
Part 3 Beyond the West
6. Resisting Arrest: Jo Ann Robinson and the Power to Movep. 139
7. The Long Strange Trip of Pamela Des Barresp. 157
8. They Paved Paradisep. 181
Notesp. 195
List of Illustrationsp. 229
Indexp. 231
Acknolwedgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Part 1 Before the West
1. Seeking Sacagaweap. 11
2. The Hearth of Darkness: Susan Magoffin on Suspect Terrainp. 35
Part 2 In the West
3. Empire, Liberty, and Legend: Woman Suffrage in Wyomingp. 67
4. Marking Wyoming: Grace Raymond Hebard and the West as Woman's Placep. 93
5. "So Many Miles to a Person": Fabiola Cabeza de Baca Makes New Mexicop. 115
Part 3 Beyond the West
6. Resisting Arrest: Jo Ann Robinson and the Power to Movep. 139
7. The Long Strange Trip of Pamela Des Barresp. 157
8. They Paved Paradisep. 181
Notesp. 195
List of Illustrationsp. 229
Indexp. 231

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