Cover image for An actor's guide to performing Shakespeare : for film, television, and theatre
Title:
An actor's guide to performing Shakespeare : for film, television, and theatre
Author:
Harold, Madd, 1973-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hollywood : Lone Eagle ; [Lanham, MD] : Distributed to the trade by National Book Network, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
xii, 288 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9781580650465
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PR3091 .H38 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Offers a concise guide to Shakespeare's secrets, language, plays, characters, and acting techniques.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Harold frames his introduction to this how-to-play Shakespeare instruction manual with the rhetorical question: "Who [sic] Is This Book For?" Reassuring actors for whom he has written this primer that this is "not an academic book," the author avows that his "easy-to-read" study is "different" from what he denounces as the common run of intellectual blather devoted to examining the "beast" of Shakespeare. Since the book lacks both bibliography and annotation, one cannot know the depth of Harold's investigation of the literature, volumes such as John Barton's Playing Shakespeare (1984) and Cicely Berry's seminal The Actor and His Text (CH, Dec'88). The last 12 months greeted the arrival of at least three other notably user-friendly volumes offering similar instruction: Louis Fantasia's Instant Shakespeare (CH, Dec'02), Rhona Silverbush and Sami Plotkin's Speak the Speech! (CH, Mar'03), and Patsy Rodenburg's Speaking Shakespeare (CH, Apr'03). Although this reviewer challenges the author's pose of originality, Harold does provide peculiarly interesting perspectives and some distinctive tools for actors: e.g., analytical techniques for comprehending "phrasing" structure in ways that empower playing. On the whole, the worthwhile contents of this volume amount to more than those parts featuring banal chatter. Summing Up: Optional. Lower-division undergraduates, students of technical theater, and beginning professionals. P. D. Nelsen Marlboro College


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