Cover image for The genesis of The brothers Karamazov : the aesthetics, ideology, and psychology of text making
Title:
The genesis of The brothers Karamazov : the aesthetics, ideology, and psychology of text making
Author:
Belknap, Robert L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Evanston, Ill. : Northwestern University Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
x, 199 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780810108455

9780810108462
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PG3325.B73 B38 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Belknap (Slavic languages, Columbia U.) traces Dostoevsky's last, great novel to its sources, exploring how the author consciously transformed his experience and his readings to construct the work. It is both a lucid analysis of a complex and difficult text and an inquiry into the process of literary creation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Challenging the belief that there is little new to say about the great works of literature such as The Brothers Karamazov Dostoevsky's and perhaps world literature's greatest novel, Belknap has written a unique, thought-provoking study proving that great literature is never finite, but constantly open to new ideas and interpretations. Sometimes Belknap uses traditional techniques of comparative analysis for showing sources that influenced Dostoevsky; at other times he delves into the theoretical as in his chapter on the theme of memory and how it relates to Dostoevsky. At times the author deals with specifics--e.g., "The Orgins of a Single Paragraph Reveal the Unconscious Transformations that Shape Alesha Karamazov"; at times he generalizes--e.g., "Dostoevsky's Attitudes Shaped the Attitudes of His Characters and His Readers." A creative and, for the most part convincing study of a literary giant by a well-known Slavic scholar. Highly recommended for the serious student of Russian literature. E. Yarwood Eastern Washington University


Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1 Introductory
Chapter 2 Dostoevsky Read Enormously in Books and Periodicals Old and New, Russian and European, Good and Bad, Literary and Nonliterary
Chapter 3 Dostoevsky Condensed a Lifetime of Preparation into a Year of Planning and Two Years of Writing
Chapter 4 Dostoevsky Kept Merging and Reworking the Sources of Mitia Karamazov to Form a New Character and a New Plot
Chapter 5 The Theme of Memory Enters the Novel from a Rich Body of Reading and Other Experience
Chapter 6 The Origins of a Single Paragraph Reveal the Unconscious Transformations that Shape Alesha Karamazov
Chapter 7 Dostoevsky's Attitudes Shape the Arguments Ivan Karamazov Inherits and Uses
Chapter 8 Dostoevsky's Attitudes Shaped the Attitudes of His Characters and His Readers
Chapter 9 Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Studies of the Harriman Institute
Index

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