Cover image for Rudolph shines again
Title:
Rudolph shines again
Author:
May, Robert L. (Robert Lewis), 1905-1976.
Uniform Title:
Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer, shines again
Publication Information:
New York : Grosset & Dunlap, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
Devastated when his nose loses its shine, Rudolph spends all his time crying and feeling sorry for himself until he becomes involved in the search for two baby rabbits.
General Note:
Edition of 1954 published under title: Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer, shines again.

Sequel to: Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.2 0.5 86417.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780448431987
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Once again, Santa needs Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to lead his sleigh on a dark, snowy Christmas eve. But mean teasing from the other reindeer causes Rudolph to lose his light! Rudolph saved Christmas once, but can he do it again-this time without his red glow? Illustrated by Lisa Papp.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Caparo follows his 2014 reimagining of May's Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer with a handsomely illustrated sequel, originally published in 1954. Rudolph is once again ostracized by his peers and assigned the worst tasks in Santa's workshop, and his confidence plummets: " 'Oh poor little me,' he would pity and pout./ Till one day the light in his nose just went out!" Determined to start anew, Rudolph runs away and lands in a forest, where he rescues a pair of lost rabbit siblings and soars home in time to guide Santa's sleigh through snow and fog once more. There are some clumsy lines as the story unfolds ("Just picture the Mother and Dad Rabbits' joy,/ When Rudolph brought back both their girl and their boy!"), but Caparo's images are again distinguished by cinematic stagings and dramatic lighting. Ages 4-6. Illustrator's agency: Shannon Associates. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-May penned the original tale of the plucky reindeer with the shining nose for the Montgomery Ward department stores to give away to customers in 1939, and it became a huge hit. In 1954 he published the sequel, originally titled Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Shines Again. A Little Golden Book version was also published in 1982. It's Christmas again, and Rudolph is having a hard time. His fellow reindeer and the elves are all jealous of him and treat him badly, which causes him to sulk and whine, and suddenly, his nose stops glowing. Thoroughly disheartened, he runs off to the woods, where he encounters a large and unhappy rabbit family, worried about their two missing children. Rudolph offers to search and uses his eyes and ears to avoid predators and find the lost bunnies. After he safely returns them, he decides to go back and help Santa any way he can, and because he's given up his whining and weeping, by the time he gets back to the North Pole, his glow has returned. Caparo's painterly illustrations are both lush and Disney-esque, and even the darkest images gleam with an internal light. Parents and grandparents will most appreciate the very evident moral of the tale. VERDICT An old-fashioned holiday story, presented in a most cinematic way.-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.