Cover image for Voices made flesh : performing women's autobiography
Title:
Voices made flesh : performing women's autobiography
Author:
Miller, Lynn C.
Publication Information:
Madison : University of Wisconsin Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
vii, 322 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Risky business : exploring women's autobiography and performance / M. Heather Carver -- Intimate partners : a critical autobiography of performing Anais̈ / Elyse Lamm Pineau -- Gertrude Stein never enough / Lynn C. Miller -- Mule of the world : the embodiment of Mary Church Terrell / Eileen C. Cherry -- Desire in evidence / Stacy Wolf -- Too wild for her own good : searching for the real Calamity Jane / M. Heather Carver -- Georgia O'Keeffe x Catherine Rogers / Catherine Rogers -- The last reading of Charlotte Cushman / Carolyn Gage -- Performing historical figures : the metadramatics of women's autobiographical performance / Carol Hanbery MacKay -- Illustrated woman : autoperformance in "Skins : a daughter's (re)construction of cancer" and "Tattoo stories : a postscript to Skins" / Tami Spry -- On being an exemplary lesbian : my life as a role model / Jacqueline Taylor -- A clean breast of it / Linda Park-Fuller -- sista docta / Joni L. Jones -- The performance of drowning / Terry Galloway -- Death in the art and life of Linda M. Montano / Linda M. Montano -- Shaping the world with our hands / Laila Farah -- "Orchids in the Arctic" : women's autobiographical performances as mentoring / Elizabeth Bell.
ISBN:
9780299184209

9780299184247
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS338.W6 V65 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

"Voices Made Flesh includes scripts and essays about performances of the lives of women such as Gertrude Stein, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Anus Nin, which consider issues that arise when a woman represents another woman's life. In the second section, seven performers tell their own stories, engaging issues of sexual orientation, ethnicity, race, loss of parent, disability, life and death. Voices highlights issues of representation, identity, and staging in autobiographical performance. It examines the links between theory and criticism of women's autobiography, feminist performance theory, and performance practice


Summary

Fourteen bold, dynamic, and daring women take the stage in this collection of women's lives and stories. Individually and collectively, these writers and performers speak the unspoken and perform the heretofore unperformed.

The first section includes scripts and essays about performances of the lives of Gertrude Stein, Georgia O'Keeffe, Mary Church Terrell, Charlotte Cushman, Ana#65533;s Nin, Calamity Jane, and Mary Martin. The essays consider intriguing interpretive issues that arise when a woman performer represents another woman's life. In the second section, seven performers--Tami Spry, Jacqueline Taylor, Linda Park-Fuller, Joni Jones, Terri Galloway, Linda M. Montano, and Laila Farah--tell their own stories. Ranging from narrrative lectures (sometimes aided by slides and props) to theatrical performances, their works wrest comic and dramatic meaning from a world too often chaotic and painful. Their performances engage issues of sexual orientation, ethnicity, race, loss of parent, disability, life and death, and war and peace. The volume as a whole highlights issues of representation, identity, and staging in autobiographical performance. It examines the links among theory and criticism of women's autobiography, feminist performance theory, and performance practice.


Author Notes

Lynn C. Miller is associate professor in the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of Texas at Austin. Jacqueline Taylor is professor of Communication at DePaul University. M. Heather Carver is assistant professor of Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Missouri, Columbia.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Providing a valuable exploration of performances of notable historical or literary figures and the performance of self, this volume covers material ranging from personal narratives performed as lectures to formal staged presentations. The first of the book's two parts features seven writer-performers who view a historical figure (e.g., Anais Nin, Gertrude Stein, Mary Church Terrell) through their own autobiographical selves. Stacy Wolf "raises questions about gay and lesbian historiography and the layered tensions of biography and spectatorship" as she examines Mary Martin; playwright Catherine Rogers performs self and other in "Georgia O'Keeffe x Catherine Rogers"; and Carolyn Gage reimagines Charlotte Cushman in her final stage performance, an aging lesbian dying of breast cancer. Offering seven approaches for bringing personal subjectivity and agency into performance, the second part of the book, "Staging the Self," includes Jacqueline Taylor's essay "On Being an Exemplary Lesbian: My Life as a Role Model"; Linda Park-Fuller's "A Clean Breast of It," dealing with her survival of breast cancer; and Elizabeth Bell's essay on the value of women's autobiographical performances as mentoring for women in the academy. Throughout, women boldly make the private self public, creating new views of the female subject on the stage. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Undergraduates and scholars studying performance and women's studies. E. C. Ramirez formerly, St. Philip's College


Choice Review

Providing a valuable exploration of performances of notable historical or literary figures and the performance of self, this volume covers material ranging from personal narratives performed as lectures to formal staged presentations. The first of the book's two parts features seven writer-performers who view a historical figure (e.g., Anais Nin, Gertrude Stein, Mary Church Terrell) through their own autobiographical selves. Stacy Wolf "raises questions about gay and lesbian historiography and the layered tensions of biography and spectatorship" as she examines Mary Martin; playwright Catherine Rogers performs self and other in "Georgia O'Keeffe x Catherine Rogers"; and Carolyn Gage reimagines Charlotte Cushman in her final stage performance, an aging lesbian dying of breast cancer. Offering seven approaches for bringing personal subjectivity and agency into performance, the second part of the book, "Staging the Self," includes Jacqueline Taylor's essay "On Being an Exemplary Lesbian: My Life as a Role Model"; Linda Park-Fuller's "A Clean Breast of It," dealing with her survival of breast cancer; and Elizabeth Bell's essay on the value of women's autobiographical performances as mentoring for women in the academy. Throughout, women boldly make the private self public, creating new views of the female subject on the stage. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Undergraduates and scholars studying performance and women's studies. E. C. Ramirez formerly, St. Philip's College


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