Cover image for Seal IV
Title:
Seal IV
Author:
Seal, 1963-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Burbank, CA : Warner Bros., [2003]

â„—2003
Physical Description:
1 audio disc (52 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Compact disc.
Language:
English
Contents:
Get it together -- Love's divine -- Waiting for you -- My vision -- Don't make me wait -- Let me roll -- Touch -- Where there's gold -- Loneliest star -- Heavenly ... (good feeling) -- Tinsel Town -- Get it together (reprise).
UPC:
093624794721
Format :
Music CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Lackawanna Library BPR 2688 Compact Disc Branch Audiobook CD
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Audubon Library BPR 2688 Compact Disc Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library BPR 2688 Compact Disc Audio Visual
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Besides taking his usual multi-year hiatus before releasing Seal IV, the artist scrapped a whole album's worth of material, feeling he couldn't stand behind the strength of the songs (should this be Seal IV.I?). It's disappointing, then, that the songs on Seal IV lack any of the Grammy-grabbing flair of his earlier releases. What saves it is a conviction that is high enough to overcome, a voice that is more driven than usual, and some genuine moments of songwriting inspiration. "Let Me Roll" has a cool swagger and fun wordplay, and the yearning ballad "Loneliest Star" is only a few steps away from "Kiss from a Rose." Opener "Get It Together" offers an Up With People understanding of the state of the world with its "everyone is beautiful" sentimentality, but it's the funky backbeat and gritty vocals that make it more Al Green than Lee Greenwood. A re-recording of Seal's collaboration with Jakatta, "My Vision" is given new life through more restrained than usual production from Trevor Horn. The absence of Horn's usual bombast throughout the album allows Seal's voice (in every sense of the word) to be the focus. It's a good move, and if the totally solid Jakatta-sourced track is any indication, a break from Horn might be beneficial next time. Despite being heavy with unexceptional tunes, Seal IV has enough going for it to warrant the next four years of anticipation. ~ David Jeffries


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