Cover image for The Monitor : the iron warship that changed the world
Title:
The Monitor : the iron warship that changed the world
Author:
Thompson, Gare.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Grosset & Dunlap, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
48 pages ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Discusses the Monitor and the Virginia, ironclad warships that confronted each other at the Civil War battle at Hampton Roads, Virginia, detailing what became of the ships after the battle and how the sunken Monitor was later investigated by scientists.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
770 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.0 1.0 74430.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.7 4 Quiz: 47283.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780448432830

9780448432458
Format :
Book

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E595.M7 T48 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E595.M7 T48 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The U.S.S. Monitor was an entirely new type of warship when it launched in 1862. Dubbed "the forefather of the modern Navy, " this ironclad ship changed how wars are fought at sea. But on New Year's Eve, 1862, it sank off the coast of North Carolina in a terrible storm. No one thought the Monitor could be raised, but after 140 years, parts of the ironclad have finally been brought to the surface. This book chronicles the Monitor's revolutionary design, exciting battle, and intriguing excavation.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. From the All Aboard Reading series, this book tells a double story. The first part concerns the building of the ironclad ship the Monitor during the Civil War, its epic battle with the Virginia (formerly known as the Merrimac), and its sinking during a fierce Atlantic storm. The second part describes twentieth-century efforts to find the Monitor on the ocean floor and to raise and restore its gun turret. Thompson's narrative relates the Monitor's history in an exciting yet responsible way, and Day's attractive illustrations, evidently in ink and watercolor, enhance the drama and clarify details. Although the book has no back matter, not even an index, it clearly presents a story that will interest many young readers. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2003 Booklist