Cover image for A horse named Seabiscuit
Title:
A horse named Seabiscuit
Author:
Dubowski, Mark.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Grosset & Dunlap, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
47 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
An introduction to the life and career of Seabiscuit, the race horse who set sixteen track records and won more prize money than any other horse.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
430 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.1 0.5 74417.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 2.9 2 Quiz: 34153 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780448433424

9780448433431
Format :
Book

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READER Juvenile Fiction New Materials
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Seabiscuit didn't start out a winner. He was a runt who was squat and funny looking. But Seabiscuit became a champion, and during the dark days of the Depression, he grew so popular that newspapers, radio shows, and magazines covered his every move. The soul and personality of this great-hearted horse are captured in this lively easy reader with beautiful illustrations as well as period photos. Illustrated by Mark Rowe.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3. Close on the heels of the movie Seabiscuit, this offers emerging readers a brief recounting of this racehorse's life. The Dubowskis explain that despite being the offspring of racing champions, Seabiscuit, small, overweight, and with crooked forelegs, never won a race during his first two seasons and spent more time sleeping than running until trainer Tom Smith gave him a second chance. Through hard work, the horse eventually won 33 races in six years. Rowe's many realistic illustrations, accompanied by some period photos, capture the sports action as well as the personalities of both horse and trainer. The use of a fairly restricted color palette (grays, browns, and pink accents) gives the feeling that some of the pictures are actually colorized photos. Pair this with Barbara Libby's I Rode the Red Horse: Secretariat's Belmont Race (2003) for another look at a famous racehorse. --Kay Weisman Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-This straightforward account focuses on the racehorse's rise from "a big disappointment" in spite of his excellent bloodlines to a great champion and symbol of hope during the Great Depression. The authors cover the basics, describing how Seabiscuit's looks left a lot to be desired, his odd sleeping habits, and the fact that he was difficult to handle until he acquired some unusual companions, including a spider monkey. They also detail the horse's attempts to win the Santa Anita Handicap in California, a victory that alluded him for years. Only Seabiscuit's trainer, Tom Smith, is mentioned by name. The lively text will keep readers' interest as they follow this amazing animal's life. The soft-toned realistic illustrations and occasional black-and-white photographs nicely complement the story. This easy-reader would make an excellent companion to Kat Shehata's Seabiscuit vs. War Admiral (Angel Bea, 2003); both books provide solid information for short reports.-Carol Schene, Taunton Public Schools, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.