Cover image for The Rosie stories
Title:
The Rosie stories
Author:
Voigt, Cynthia.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 2003.
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
Rosie, a dog who loves to eat, waits for breakfast, gets into the garbage can for lunch, and joins the family in following along with an exercise video.
Language:
English
Contents:
Good morning, Rosie! -- Hold the fort, Rosie! -- Let's get some exercise, Rosie!
Reading Level:
320 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 73323.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 3 Quiz: 35768 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823416257
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Rosie, a dog who loves to eat, waits for breakfast, gets into the garbage can for lunch, and joins the family in following along with an exercise video. She is a cheerful dog who is determined to get exactly what she wants.


Author Notes

Cynthia Voigt was born on February 25, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts. She received a bachelor's degree from Smith College, did graduate work at St. Michael's College, and later received a teacher's certification from Christian Brothers College. After college, she worked for an advertising agency. Before becoming a full-time author, she was a secretary and a high school English teacher. Her first book, Homecoming, was published in 1981.

Her children's books address such issues at child abuse and racism, topics that are not often talked about in books designed for children. She is the author of numerous books including the Bad Girls series, the Tillerman Cycle series, and the Kingdom series. She won the Notable Children's Trade Book in the field of social studies for Homecoming, the Newbery Medal, ALA in 1983 for Dicey's Song, and the Edgar Allan Poe Award in 1984 for The Callender Papers. In 1995, she received the MAE Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3. Award-winning YA novelist Voigt turns to a younger audience who are making the transition to chapter books. Rosie the dog takes center stage as she romps through the day with its ups and downs. In Good Morning, Rosie, she waits for everyone else before she gets her breakfast, unsuccessfully trying to hurry her humans by barking their words back to them. She gets into trouble in Hold the Fort, Rosie! when she attempts to knock over the trash. And in the hilarious final story, Let's Get Some Exercise, Rosie! she gamely follows along as Mommy and the two kids exercise in front of the TV. Voigt cleverly uses Rosie's repetition of words to create a feeling of success in new readers. Just the right amount of illustrations delightfully capture Rosie's antics. --Louise Brueggeman Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The naughty pooch from Stories About Rosie returns for three new adventures in The Rosie Stories by Cynthia Voigt, illus. by Cat Bowman Smith, a liberally illustrated chapter book. In one tale, Rosie just can't understand why the family gets fed three times a day, and she doesn't, so she tips over the garbage can and ferrets out the best parts. Youngsters will appreciate a narrative that reflects what Rosie thinks and understands ("Rosie didn't know evil and wicked, but she knew bad and out"). (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-3-Rosie, a lively pup, lives with Mommy, Daddy, Duff, and Jessie. In the first of three related stories that use short sentences and simple language, the family eats breakfast, insisting that their pet wait to be fed until they are finished. In a minute-by-minute account of the meal, Duff tries to negotiate a moneymaking opportunity to wash the family car and announces that he wants to be called Peter; Jessie resists eating; Mommy pats hungry Rosie on the head, and more. Children are sure to be confused-or as impatient as the dog-about why she has to wait. In the second tale, the dog is home alone, and she investigates the food smells "from the tall thing kept under the sink." Mommy returns to a mess, angrily saying, "You're a very bad dog." "Out, Rosie. You are evil and wicked." Back inside and left alone again, the pet digs into the garbage, making another mess and later prompting anger from Daddy and the children. Mommy finally places a large spoon through the cabinet handles to block Rosie from the trash. In the last story, after dinner the pup joins the family workout as they watch a Jane Fonda exercise tape, which makes everyone laugh. Despite Smith's appealing, boldly colored illustrations, children may not have the heart to read to the end to witness the family's love of Rosie.-Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.