Cover image for The best book of snakes
Title:
The best book of snakes
Author:
Gunzi, Christiane.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Kingfisher, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Introduces snakes of the world, including the cobra, anaconda, and various constrictors and sea snakes.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.6 0.5 73490.
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hm031/2003044653.html
ISBN:
9780753455784
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Status
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Being fixed/mended
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL666.O6 G86 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Every aspect of snakes is covered, from camouflage and cold-bloodedness to how they move and kill their prey. Children who are fascinated by snakes will also discover how they feed and raise their young, how to study snakes, and why some snakes are endangered. Specially commissioned art shows a variety of these animals--flying snakes, sea snakes, and also more infamous snakes such as the black mamba and king cobra--in their habitats.


Author Notes

Christiane Gunzi is the author of several natural history books for children. Her works for Kingfisher include The Best Book of Big Cats, The Best Book of Snakes, The Best Book of Endangered and Extinct Animals, and The Best Book of Whales and Dolphins.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Some of the world's most dangerous serpents are featured in this profusely illustrated overview. Vivid, realistic paintings appear on every page. Some are fairly small, set against a plain white background and juxtaposed with the paragraphs of text (one section offers a pictorial survey of 16 species). Others are full page or on spreads showing the reptiles in their natural habitats, usually attacking prey. While most of the loosely organized text is clearly written, it suffers, to some extent, from oversimplification (e.g., the suggestion that all venom is deadly). More problematic is the dichotomy between the book's professed objective view and its sensationalism. While it states that most snakes are harmless and makes a plea for conservation, the volume includes mostly venomous species, emphasizes the danger snakes pose to humans, and contains numerous dramatic illustrations of the reptiles in attack mode. Dorothy Hinshaw Patent's colorful Slinky, Scaly, Slithery Snakes (Walker, 2000), aimed at about the same age level, is a better choice. It covers most of the same topics, is more tightly organized, and has a consistently lucid text and a more scientifically objective point of view.-Karey Wehner, formerly at San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.