Cover image for The big bad wolf
Title:
The big bad wolf
Author:
Patterson, James, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Time Warner Audiobooks, [2003]

â„—2003
Physical Description:
7 audio discs (approximately 8 hours) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Unabridged.

Compact discs.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781586215804
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

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Clarence Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Grand Island Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Clearfield Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Clearfield Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Clearfield Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Clearfield Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Dudley Branch Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Williamsville Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Frank E. Merriweather Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Anna M. Reinstein Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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North Collins Library FICTION CD Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

Alex Cross's first case since joining the FBI has his new colleagues stymied. Across the country, beautiful women are being kidnapped-to be bought and sold as slaves. Behind this depraved scheme stands a shadowy figure known only as The Wolf, a master criminal who has brought a new reign of terror to organized crime. With Alex's personal life in chaos because of his ex-fiance's return and with the FBI's caution testing his patience, Alex has to go out on his own. For to stalk a ruthless predator without a name or a face, Alex Cross must become a lone wolf himself...


Summary

Far worse than puffing down houses, the eponymous wolf in this story is a former KGB agent hired to make the sexually depraved fantasies of his cyberspace clients come true. FBI trainee Alex Cross is on the trail of the series' most lurid character yet.


Author Notes

James Patterson was born in Newburgh, New York, on March 22, 1947. He graduated from Manhattan College in 1969 and received a M. A. from Vanderbilt University in 1970. His first novel, The Thomas Berryman Number, was written while he was working in a mental institution and was rejected by 26 publishers before being published and winning the Edgar Award for Best First Mystery.

He is best known as the creator of Alex Cross, the police psychologist hero of such novels as Along Came a Spider and Kiss the Girls. Cross has been portrayed on the silver screen by Morgan Freeman. He has had eleven on his books made into movies and ranks as number 3 on the Hollywood Reporter's '25 Most Powerful Authors' 2016 list. He also writes the Women's Murder Club series, the Michael Bennett series, the Maximum Ride series, Daniel X series, the Witch and Wizard series, BookShots series, Private series, and the Middle School series for children. He has won numerous awards including the BCA Mystery Guild's Thriller of the Year, the International Thriller of the Year award, and the Reader's Digest Reader's Choice Award.

James Patterson introduced the Bookshots Series in 2016 which is advertised as All Thriller No Filler. The first book in the series, Cross Kill, made the New York Times Bestseller list in June 2016. The third and fourth books, The Trial, and Little Black Dress, made the New York Times Bestseller list in July 2016. The next books in the series include, $10,000,000 Marriage Proposal, French Kiss, Hidden: A Mitchum Story (co-authored with James O. Born). and The House Husband (co-authored Duane Swierczynski).

Patterson's novel, co-authored with Maxine Paetro, Woman of God, became a New York Times bestseller in 2016.

Patterson co-authored with John Connoly and Tim Malloy the true crime expose Filthy Rich about billionaire convicted sex offender Jeffrey Eppstein.

In January 2017, he co-authored with Ashwin Sanghi the bestseller Private Delhi. And in August 2017, he co-authored with Richard Dilallo, The Store.

The Black Book is a stand-alone thriller, co-authored by James Patterson and David Ellis.

(Bowker Author Biography) James Patterson is the author of seven major national bestsellers in a row. These include "Along Came a Spider", "Kiss the Girls", "Jack & Jill", "Cat & Mouse", "When the Wind Blows", "Pop Goes the Weasel", &, in paperback, "The Midnight Club". A past winner of the prestigious Edgar Award, Patterson lives in Florida.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Alex Cross finally took the plunge at the end of Four Blind Mice (2002) and joined the FBI. The training is a little beneath Cross, who has spent years working with the FBI on the toughest cases, but he dutifully attends classes until he's pulled out to consult on a case. Wealthy women have been disappearing around the country. The latest, a judge's wife, was snatched at a shopping mall. It appears these women (and soon several young men as well) are being abducted and sold to people who have "selected" them and paid a hefty sum. The man behind it all is a Russian known only as the Wolf. Cross gets a break when one of the buyers releases the woman he paid to have abducted, but when they track him down, they find he's committed suicide. Then a major bombshell in his personal life distracts Cross from the case: his ex-girlfriend Christine, the mother of his youngest son, has reappeared, and she wants custody. Cross' first major case with the FBI will have readers on the edge of their seats, swiftly turning the pages to the exciting showdown. --Kristine Huntley Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a recent column in Entertainment Weekly, Stephen King cited Patterson's thrillers as the example of "dopey" bestsellers. We hope that doesn't mean that those who enjoy them are dopes, because this new one is vastly entertaining. Alex Cross, Patterson's black lawman hero, has left the D.C. police force for the FBI. But Cross was a star cop, so when the Bureau becomes aware that attractive white women are disappearing at an unusually high rate in the nation's capital, Cross, despite still being in training at Quantico, is brought onto the case and is personally mentored by the Bureau's director, earning the ire of some Feds but the support of others. Behind the disappearances is a sexual slavery operation run as a sideline by one of the more believable and most compellingly evil villains in the Patterson universe, the Wolf, a mysterious former KGB man who's now the world's top mobster. The narrative throughout is swift and varied, as Patterson cuts among the diabolical schemes of a Russian magnate who may be the Wolf, the plight of several kidnap victims, the dogged pursuit by Cross and company of the Wolf, and the hideous designs of the members of an encrypted computer chat room who pay the Wolf fortunes to snatch women who fit their fantasies. And there's domestic drama, too, as the mother of Cross's young son, Alex, decides that she wants her boy back. Full of plot surprises and featuring a balanced mix of intrigue, hard action and angst, the novel, on which Patterson notably does not share cover credit, grips from start to finish. The Alex Cross series remains Patterson's finest, and this is the finest Cross in years. Maybe we're dopes, but we're smiling ones.(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

There is something to be said for consistency. Alex Cross is back, and even though he's newly employed by the FBI, everything still feels familiar and right. "Club Fed" training is going as well as one would expect, Nana is still making the best coffee in town, and Alex is still feeling guilty about his workaholic ways. When the wife of a federal judge is kidnapped, making it FBI business, Alex is pulled out of class and sent to the crime scene, creating an interesting dichotomy of newly minted federal agent/star. It turns out to be just the latest in a string of such kidnappings, and the FBI suspects a possible white slavery ring. Topping the list of suspects is the Russian Red Mafiya king, who has been shaking things up with La Cosa Nostra. Things are bumpy at home, too-a custody dispute emerges when Little Alex's mom blows into town. There are no tidy endings here, just an engrossing story that will leave readers clamoring for the sequel. The Big Bad Wolf is the biggest, baddest Alex Cross novel in years. Strongly recommended for all public libraries.-Stacy Alesi, Southwest Cty. Regional Lib., Boca Raton, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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