Cover image for Clorinda
Title:
Clorinda
Author:
Kinerk, Robert.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Defying the odds, Clorinda the cow follows her dream of becoming a ballet dancer.
General Note:
"A Paula Wiseman Book."
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 0.5 74022.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689864490
Format :
Book

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Meet Clorinda!
Life on the farm is everything a cow like Clorinda could want, or so she thought. Then one Election Day, while up at dawn to travel to the distant city to cast her annual ballot, Clorinda is confused by the signs and stumbles into a performance of classical ballet instead. Bewilderment soon gives way to enchantment and she loses her heart to the magic of the dance. Clorinda's dream of becoming a bovine ballerina is set and she's headed for the big-city stage to start her career. Her mottoes, "Be bold and imaginative! Shoot for the sky!"
Robert Kinerk's witty and spirited verses combine with Steven Kellogg's effervescent and expansive artwork to introduce an endearing heroine. Irrepressible Clorinda will inspire standing ovations and cries of "ENCORE!" from picture-book readers of all ages.


Author Notes

Stephen Kellogg was born in Norwalk, Connecticut on October 26, 1941. He attended the Rhode Island School of Design and majored in illustration. While in college, he won a fellowship to spend his senior year studying and working in Florence, Italy.

Kellogg has illustrated over one hundred titles and written some of his own. Titles he has written include the Island of the Skog, which won the Michigan State Young Readers Award, and was included on Booklist's Books for Every Child and the CBC Books for Peace list, A Rose for Pinkerton!, Pinkerton, Behave!, and Tallyho, Pinkerton!

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. Clorinda is just a farm cow until she goes to the ballet. There, a dream is born. A clever rhyming text (which successfully scans!) follows Clorinda to New York, where she waits tables as she hopes for the chance to show the world she can really dance. Rejection? Of course: We simply aren't hiring cows now, my dear. But she perseveres, and is finally able to phone Farmer Len with the news that she's going to dance Giselle. Still, there are problems. She warns fellow dancer Lou that he may not be able to catch her, and, sure enough, in a marvelous two-page spread, the worst happens: Lou is flattened. But the crowd cheers anyway, applauding the dancers' willingness to do their best. Clorinda's debut is also her closing night, but her return to the farm is triumphant; she's enlisted to teach ballet to a delighted array of pigs, chicks, cats, and ducks. As fine a mix of story and message as this is, it's the irrepressible art that makes this book shine. Kellogg is at the top of his game, finding the humor in every line, whipping his scenes into a design so varied that children will never be bored, and offering a bovine so divine that it's hard to take your eyes off her. Much applause for Clorinda. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Kinerk's (Slim and Miss Prim) rhyming tale centers on a cow who goes to town to vote, but instead of casting her ballot inadvertently attends a ballet and is inspired to try dancing herself. Back on the farm, Clorinda asks farmhand Len to build her a stage, where the tutu-clad bovine ballerina practices her positions, much to the disdain of the other animals, who announce, "No, no. That won't do./ You're only a cow, and what they do is moo!" Encouraged by Len, Clorinda heads for Manhattan, where she fails to land even an audition and takes a job waiting tables. After she gets her big break, the determined dancer practices her leap and worriedly sizes up her relatively slight partner: "Somehow,/ you may want to think twice about catching a cow," she advises him. Her fears are well founded: the airborne cow lands on her partner, yet earns cheers and applause anyway. Reinforcing Len's message, her fellow dancer explains, "They're doing all this because each understands/ the thing most important is making a try-/ you can't always triumph. You can't always fly." The cleverness of Kinerk's verse varies and its rhythm occasionally falters, although the tone remains invariably cheerful. Rendered in his trademark palette and exuberant style, Kellogg's illustrations emphasize the comical elements of the story. The back flap hints at an encore performance from Clorinda, too. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Clorinda is happy with her bovine life on the farm until the fateful November day that she goes into town to vote, and ends up watching a ballet. Deciding to become a dancer, she puts on a tutu and practices in the barn on a stage that a farmhand builds for her. Although the other animals are not supportive ("No, no. That won't do./You're only a cow, and what they do is MOO!"), the farmhand is more encouraging, and Clorinda heads for New York City. She takes a job waiting tables to pay the bills and continues going on auditions. She finally gets her big break in Giselle, but soon comes to realize that dancing is not the best occupation for a cow. She heads home only to realize that she can still perform there. The colorful and zany illustrations are classic Kellogg. The pictures are filled with motion, and Clorinda manages to achieve a certain grace, despite her lumbering appearance. The spread where she flattens the dance partner who is trying to catch her is laugh-out-loud funny. This story told in rhyme is sure to produce many chuckles from youngsters who will delight in Clorinda's dreams of stardom.-Kristin de Lacoste, South Regional Public Library, Pembroke Pines, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.