Cover image for Yikes!
Title:
Yikes!
Author:
Florczak, Robert.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Blue Sky Press, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
A young boy sees such fearsome and exotic creatures as a cobra, gorillas, and crocodiles when he goes on safari.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780590050432
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Oversize
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Riverside Branch Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Florczak aims for the younger set with a nature fantasy written almost entirely in interjections. Each oversize spread features an encounter between a pith-helmeted boy explorer (who utters the exclamations) and different exotic critters and insects.... 'Whee!' says the boy as he swings through the trees with a family of orangutans. 'Yikes!!!' is his response when the gaping mouth of a humongous Nile crocodile threatens to devour him in one gulp...Kids who like their animals ferocious will be wild for this one." - Publishers Weekly


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS. A girl in safari garb travels through wild and dangerous places, and extra large double-page spreads in bright neon colors show her close-up encounters with fierce animals. The only words are shouts of terror (Yow! Aaaah! ) as the girl--and any kid turning the pages--comes face to face with a snarling Bengal tiger, a Nile crocodile, and more. She finds herself touching a Thai cobra; she nearly steps on an emperor scorpion. At the back of the book are visual notes and basic facts about each creature, including where it lives, what it eats, how big and heavy it is, and asterisks indicate an endangered or threatened species. The thrilling adventure will appeal to preschoolers, and the conservation message will grab them, too. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In his first work as both author and illustrator, Florczak aims for the younger set with a nature fantasy written almost entirely in interjections. Each oversize spread features an encounter between a pith-helmeted boy explorer (who utters the exclamations) and different exotic critters and insects (an illustrated glossary on the final page identifies and describes each). "Whee!" says the boy as he swings through the trees with a family of orangutans. "Yikes!!!" is his response when the gaping mouth of a humongous Nile crocodile threatens to devour him in one gulp. Dispensing with the painterly style of his work in The Rainbow Bridge, Florczak inflates scale and employs heightened, sometimes psychedelic color to play up another forte: startling, photo-like realism. In one spread, the boy's hand-just larger than life, and cinematically lit-reaches into the frame and almost touches an Australian frilled lizard that's in a fierce defensive posture; the individuated blades of grass vibrate in a riot of greens and yellows, while the lizard is a swirl of hot-orange scales. Florczak occasionally pushes the hallucinatory feel over the top (a bat cave rendered in fluorescent lavenders looks like a black-light poster), but not without a purpose: the final spread shows the boy asleep, holding a book about dangerous animals. Kids who like their animals ferocious will be wild for this one. Ages 3-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-On oversized pages and in hyperrealistic, Technicolor-style paintings, a boy dressed in safari clothes romps his way through numerous wild landscapes as he encounters such animals as a gorilla, a Komodo dragon, and a red-legged tarantula at close range. Each spread has a single word that describes the child's reaction, ranging from "Wow!" to "Eek!" At the end, it becomes clear that this has been an imaginary journey, as the boy naps against a tree while cradling a book entitled Wild and Dangerous Animals of the World. In the absence of a story, the real point of interest here is the illustrations, which are bright and arresting, and use unusual perspectives to create a sense of danger. A list of the animals along with geographical information appears at the back of the book. Children who enjoy paintings that look like photographs will "oooh" and "aaah" their way through this one.-Sue Giffard, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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