Cover image for Wolf wing
Title:
Wolf wing
Author:
Lee, Tanith.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, [2002]

©2002
Physical Description:
229 pages ; 22 cm.
Summary:
Following their marriage, Claidi and Argul are drawn back to her birthplace, the House, where yet again they are led to seek the answer to the riddle of Ustareth.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 4.7 8.0 73791.
ISBN:
9780525471622
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Claidi is back! Together at last, Claidi and Argul are looking forward to spending their lives together, but shocking news about Argul's mother-the powerful Ustareth-sends Claidi on one final adventure in an awesome new world. Fans of this witty and fast-paced fantasy series will be dazzled by the ultimate confrontation that awaits Tanith Lee's young heroine.


Author Notes

Tanith Lee, September 19, 1947 - May 24, 2015 Tanith Lee was born on September 19, 1947 in London, England, the daughter of ballroom dancers. She attended various primary schools and had a variety of jobs, from file clerk and assistant librarian to shop assistant and waitress. Lee attended an art college for one year, but felt she would be better writing her ideas than painting them.

Her first professional sale was "Eustace," a 90 page vignette which appeared in The Ninth Pan Book of Horror Stories in 1968. While Lee was working as an assistant librarian, she wrote a children's story that was accepted for publication. Others of her stories were also bought but never published. In 1971, Macmillan published "The Dragon Hoard," another children's book, which was followed by "Animal Castle" and "Princess Hynchatti and Other Stories" in 1972.

Lee was looking for a British publisher for her book "The Birthgrave," but was denied at every House she went. She then wrote to American publisher DAW, known for it's fantasy and horror selections, who immediately accepted her manuscript and published the book in 1975. Thus began a partnership between the two that lasted till 1989 and resulted in 28 books. After the publication of her third book by DAW, Lee quit her job and became a full-time freelance writer.

Lee has been nominated for the World Fantasy Award, the August Derleth Award and the Nebula. She has had more than 40 novels published, along with over 200 short stories.

Lee died peacefully in her sleep after a long illness on May 24, 2015.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. In the fourth and presumably the final episode of the Claidiournals, Claidi and Argul have married. That doesn't, however, stop them from becoming involved in the machinations of the Towers when Argul's grandmother summons them to her palace, where they are joined by Dengwi, Prince Venn, Winter Raven, and Ngarbo. They soon learn that Ustareth, Argul and Venn's mother, is alive, and that she wants them to join her in the faraway land that she has built. The trip to Ustareth's exotic utopia, fraught with adventure, is the key to Claidi's finally realizing her destiny. Unfortunately, the magic here doesn't always work within the construct Lee has spun, but readers who have faithfully followed Claidi's exploits up to this point will still want to see how everything ends. --Sally Estes Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Wolf Wing by Tanith Lee is the final installment in the four-book series. Claidi and Argul are finally married, but their lazy life in Peshamba is not all they expected. Argul misses his former life as leader of the Hulta and they both miss a life of adventure. Then they receive a mysterious summons from Argul's powerful grandmother and a perilous new episode begins. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-10-As this fourth and concluding volume of the series begins, Claidi and her beloved, Argul, are about to be married. As they travel in their magical robotic servant/ship Yinyay, they revisit Claidi's original home, as well as other sites and people from earlier volumes, confronting questions about their parentage, motivations of past friends, and the Tower's intrigue. After Argul's grandmother tells them that his sorceress mother, Ustareth, long believed dead, is alive and has created a magical land across the sea, they travel with four companions to her land of seemingly miraculous food trees and magically created animals. A confrontation with her leads to answers to some long-asked questions and a bittersweet new beginning for the travelers. Lee successfully uses Claidi's journal writing to build suspense and provide background on characters and events from previous books, though given the lack of new characters and dependence on previous events, the book's primary appeal is to fans of the series. The protagonist's deepening and sometimes ambiguous relationship with Argul, as well as the complex jealousies and romantic relationships among the other four travelers, adds interest and allows the characters to develop as their journey progresses. Claidi's world, especially Ustareth's island, is well drawn, and readers will appreciate the detail and humor Lee uses in describing people and places visited. Sherwood Smith's Crown Duel (1997) and Court Duel (1998, both Harcourt) offer another strong female heroine faced with intrigue and a touch of romance.-Beth L. Meister, Yeshiva of Central Queens, Flushing, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Bookmarksp. 3
The Clockwork Weddingp. 11
The Grove of Masksp. 19
At Homep. 33
Lion Nightp. 45
Spilling the Beansp. 60
To the South?p. 74
The House in the Lakep. 80
Usp. 95
Rough Crossingp. 107
Old Mother Sharkp. 119
The Shining Shorep. 135
Through the Wallp. 143
As Sun Is to the Candleflamep. 153
Summerp. 158
Water and Airp. 174
Earth and Firep. 184
The Masked Palacep. 191
Oursp. 212
Wolf Wingp. 224