Cover image for Snowed in with Grandmother Silk
Title:
Snowed in with Grandmother Silk
Author:
Fenner, Carol.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
75 pages : color illustrations ; 20 cm
Summary:
Ruddy is disappointed when his parents go on a cruise and he must stay with his fussy grandmother for a whole week, but an unexpected snowstorm reveals a surprising side of Grandmother Silk.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
690 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.2 1.0 74661.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.7 4 Quiz: 36579 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803728578
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Ruddy's grandmother isn't much fun. She calls him Rudford, not Ruddy, and she doesn't like noise or games or television. When Ruddy's parents go on a cruise and leave him with Grandmother Silk, Ruddy knows it's going to be a loooongten days. Then one night a snowstorm comes howling through. Ruddy and his grandmother are left without light and heat and water-and they have no one to talk to but each other. Slowly, with the help of an old chessboard, the moon, and a gorilla suit, they reach out to each other in some surprising ways. Partly a survival story, this is mostly a tale of two people who think they aren't alike at all-until they have no choice but to look for the things they have in common. Carol Fenner's portrayal of eight-year-old Ruddy is childlike and real, and Amanda Harvey's full-color illustrations capture the warmth and humor of a story that is sure to leave readers smiling. Illustrated by Amanda Harvey.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4, younger for reading aloud. Ruddy is nervous about spending 10 days with Grandmother Silk while his parents vacation. Unlike his other grandma, Grandmother Silk won't play computer games (or games of any kind, really); hates noise; and wears high heels everywhere, even to the zoo. Then a snowstorm strands Grandmother and Ruddy in the house without heat, water, electricity, or the help of Grandmother's regular cook and handyman. At first, Ruddy is cold and scared, but as he and Grandmother collect water from the lake, make delicious meals from pantry leftovers, lay fires, and play chess in fur coats, Ruddy discovers a new fun, relaxed, self-sufficient Grandmother. Fenner's well-paced story captures the drama of learning survival skills as well as a child's common dilemma: how to connect with a cranky, disapproving older relative. Harvey's pencil-and-watercolor artwork extends the warmth and gentle humor in this chapter book, which will be a good choice for beginning readers as well as for reading aloud. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-3-Ruddy is disappointed to learn that he must spend 10 days in late October with Grandmother Silk while his parents go on a cruise. This grandmother has "designer hair," wears high heels around the house, calls him Rudford, doesn't like loud noises, and, in general, isn't much fun. Her cook prepares meals and her gardener drives her to town. When a sudden, furious snowstorm hits the woman's remote country home, the power goes out, a tree tumbles down, and the roads are closed, leaving Ruddy and his grandmother to fend for themselves. Initially Grandma Silk is limited in her coping skills, but as the two get colder and hungrier, her menus expand, she realizes they can fetch water from the lake, and she begins to play chess with her grandson. As the days pass, Grandma lets down her hair and trades high heels for thick slippers and warm boots. She lets down her guard as well, taking joy in the moon and snow angels and welcoming the workmen as they restore power to her home. This warm story is suited for reading aloud to a class, a family, or in a book-club setting. Its brevity and large font make it accessible to readers making the transition to chapter books, and they'll also appreciate Harvey's full-page color illustrations that break up each chapter.-Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.