Cover image for When kids can't read, what teachers can do : a guide for teachers, 6-12
Title:
When kids can't read, what teachers can do : a guide for teachers, 6-12
Author:
Beers, G. Kylene, 1957-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
viii, 392 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
For Kylene Beers, the question of what to do when kids can't read surfaced in 1979 when she met and began teaching a boy named George. When George's parents asked her to explain why he couldn't read and how she could help, Beers, a secondary certified English teacher with no background in reading, realized she had little to offer. That moment sent her on a twenty-three-year search for answers to the question: How do we help middle and high schoolers who can't read? Now, she shares what she has learned and shows teachers how to help struggling readers with comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, word recognition, and motivation. Filled with student transcripts, detailed strategies, reproducible material, and extensive booklists, Beers' guide to teaching reading both instructs and inspires.
Language:
English
Contents:
A defining moment -- Creating independent readers -- Assessing dependent readers' needs -- Explicit instruction in comprehension -- Learning to make inference -- Frontloading meaning: pre-reading strategies -- Constructing meaning: during reading strategies -- Extending meaning: after-reading strategies -- Vocabulary: figuring out what words mean something -- Fluency and automaticity: the rhythm of reading -- Word recognition: what's after "sound it out?" -- Spelling: from word lists to how words work -- Creating the confidence to respond -- Finding the right book -- A final letter to George.
ISBN:
9780867095197
Format :
Book

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LB1050.5 .B45 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

For Kylene Beers, the question of what to do when kids can't read surfaced abruptly in 1979 when she began teaching. That year, she discovered that some of the students in her seventh-grade language arts classes could pronounce all the words, but couldn't make any sense of the text. Others couldn't even pronounce the words. And that was the year she met a boy named George.

George couldn't read. When George's parents asked her to explain what their son's reading difficulties were and what she was going to do to help, Kylene, a secondary certified English teacher with no background in reading, realized she had little to offer the parents, even less to offer their son. That defining moment sent her on a twenty-three-year search for answers to that original question: how do we help middle and high schoolers who can't read?

Now in her critical and practical text When Kids Can't Read - What Teachers Can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12 , Kylene shares what she has learned and shows teachers how to help struggling readers with

comprehension vocabulary fluency word recognition motivation Here, Kylene offers teachers the comprehensive handbook they've needed to help readers improve their skills, their attitudes, and their confidence. Filled with student transcripts, detailed strategies, reproducible material, and extensive booklists, this much-anticipated guide to teaching reading both instructs and inspires.


Author Notes

Kylene Beers, Ed.D., is a former middle school teacher who has turned her commitment to adolescent literacy and struggling readers into the major focus of her research, writing, speaking, and teaching. She is author of the best-selling When Kids Can't Read/What Teachers Can Do, co-editor (with Bob Probst and Linda Rief) of Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice, and co-author (with Bob Probst) of Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading and Reading Nonfiction, Notice & Note Stances, Signposts, and Strategies all published by Heinemann. She taught in the College of Education at the University of Houston, served as Senior Reading Researcher at the Comer School Development Program at Yale University, and most recently acted as the Senior Reading Advisor to Secondary Schools for the Reading and Writing Project at Teachers College. Kylene has published numerous articles in state and national journals, served as editor of the national literacy journal, Voices from the Middle, and was the 2008-2009 President of the National Council of Teachers of English. She is an invited speaker at state, national, and international conferences and works with teachers in elementary, middle, and high schools across the US. Kylene has served as a consultant to the National Governor's Association and was the 2011 recipient of the Conference on English Leadership outstanding leader award. Kylene is now a consultant to schools, nationally and internationally, focusing on literacy improvement with her colleague and co-author, Bob Probst.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Why do adolescents who cannot read give up on school? Why do they struggle with reading? Is there a single remedy to aid adolescents with reading problems? What are the circumstances that prevent them from reading? When adolescents cannot read, what skills and strategies can be used to aid them in becoming creative and independent readers? Beers, a practicing educator, addresses these and other questions. There is no single model, nor is there a single answer for adolescents who struggle with reading problems, because all students are different; they learn differently; and they have had varied learning experiences. Thus, it is critical for educators to be equipped with the best possible training to assist adolescents with comprehension, vocabulary, word recognition, fluency, spelling, responding to literature, and finding books that interest them. This volume offers educators practical classroom skills and strategies that can provide struggling readers with the instruction necessary to become empowered, comprehending readers. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers, lower- and upper-division undergraduate students, and professionals. V. K. Lester Tuskegee University