Cover image for 1972
Title:
1972
Author:
Rouse, Josh.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Rykodisc, [2003]

â„—2003
Physical Description:
1 audio disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in. + lyrics + 1 bonus DVD.
General Note:
Compact disc.

Accompanying DVD entitled: Fact/fiction.
Language:
English
Contents:
1972 -- Love vibration -- Sunshine (Come on lady) -- James -- Slaveship -- Come back (Light therapy) -- Under your charms -- Flight attendant -- Sparrows over Birmingham -- Rise.
Added Title:
Fact/fiction.
UPC:
014431064128
Format :
Music CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library XX(1246336.1) Compact Disc Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Josh Rouse's 1972 gives away the game in the first line of the first song, the exquisite title track, when he name-checks Carole King. The record is going back in time and it is going to have fun doing it. Rouse's records have always been highly literate and highly musical, but they have never been fun like this, and make no mistake, 1972 is a fun record. Rouse sounds as loose as a goose and the songs reflect that. Not always lyrically, as some of the songs touch on such non-fun subjects as loneliness, repression, and bitterness, but definitely musically. To that end, Brad Jones' production is spot-on perfect -- not an instrument is out of place and the whole record has a jaunty bounce and a lush dreaminess. 1972 is coated with sonic goodness: fluttering strings, piping horns, cotton-candy sweet flutes, funky percussion, handclaps, and great backing vocals. Rouse and Jones find inspiration in all the right places: in the laid-back groove of Al Green, the California haze of Fleetwood Mac, the dreamy melancholia of Nick Drake, the sexy groove of Marvin Gaye, and the wordy lilt of Jackson Browne or James Taylor. The songs are the strongest batch Rouse has written yet. "Love Vibration" is the hit single; it has everything a hit single needs: musical hooks, lyrical hooks, vocal hooks, a smoldering sax solo (optional), and a groovy video. Other songs that are sure to be in heavy rotation are "James," a funky ballad that shows off Rouse's wonderful falsetto (as does "Comeback [Light Therapy]") and takes time for that most elusive creature, a good flute solo; "Under Your Charms," a sultry, sensual ballad that takes a potentially squirm-inducing subject and actually does it right, Marvin-style; and "Rise," a beautifully orchestrated epic that ends the record on a perfect note. 1972 should vault Rouse to the forefront of intelligent pop alongside kindred spirits like Joe Pernice and Kurt Wagner (of Lambchop). If you say you've heard a better adult pop record this year, you are lying. [Initial pressings of the album came complete with a bonus DVD featuring the video for "Love Vibration" and a short documentary about Josh Rouse and his music. The first 100 copies even came with autographed liner notes.] ~ Tim Sendra


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