Cover image for It feels like snow
Title:
It feels like snow
Author:
Cote, Nancy.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Honesdale, Penn. : Boyds Mills Press, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Alice doesn't need a weather forecast to tell if it's going to snow. She can feel in in her toes, elbows and nose. Each time she feels a twitch or a tingle, she warns her neighbors.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.9 0.5 76130.
ISBN:
9781590780541
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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East Delavan Branch Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Alice doesn't need a weather forecast to tell if it's going to snow. She can feel it in her toes and elbows and nose. Each time she feels a twitch or a tingle, she warns her neighbors. "There's snow coming," she tells Etta and Gretta Grillo. "I can feel it in my toe!" Like Alice's other neighbors, the Grillo sisters laugh and ignore her warning. But sure enough, the snow falls and catches everyone by surprise--everyone that is except Alice, who has loaded in her supplies. But now she feelsa big snowstorm coming. And still her neighbors ignore her warnings. What will Alice do? The weather in Nancy Cote's adorable story may be chilly, but its heroine has a big, warm heart. Young readers will enjoy visiting with Alice and her friends, in weather snowy or clear.


Author Notes

Nancy Cote is the illustrator of thirteen picture books and has authored three of them. She lives in Somerset, Massachusetts.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

All of Alice's fellow senior citizens say she's a "silly old woman" because she firmly believes her throbbing bones and joints are harbingers of snow. But she's right. When her toe throbs, it snows ankle-deep; when her nose tingles, the flakes reach everyone's knees. When a blizzard socks in the town, she alone is prepared, but takes no satisfaction in being proved right yet again. She invites everyone over for hot soup and a cozy fire, and her unstinting hospitality prompts apologies from her friends and forges a consensus: "No one ever again thought of her as a silly old woman with nothing to do but worry." Although kids may not naturally gravitate toward a book populated chiefly by cranky elders, they will likely be able to identify with someone who's "tired of being laughed at... tired of being ignored." Cote's (illustrator of The Can-Do Thanksgiving) cartoony illustrations give Alice an eager smile, whimsical wardrobe (a big red hat, bunny slippers, gaily patterned clothing) and a menagerie of pets-including a hearth-loving cow-all of which help make her an inviting reader-surrogate. Ages 5-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-A throbbing toe, a tingle in her nose, or a clicking elbow lets Alice know when snow is on the way. She has faith in her ability to predict the weather but her neighbors do not. So while she stocks up on supplies, they remain unprepared. By the third storm, she becomes concerned for her friends and invites them over to share in her warm home and plentiful provisions. Contrite, they bring gifts to alleviate her aching bones and vow never again to think of her as "a silly old woman with nothing to do but worry." The story line is fresh and original with a repetitive structure that works. Alice is a crickety old lady and yet she shovels her own walk and chops her own wood. The illustrations both add to and detract from the book. On the plus side, the extended family of cats, a dog, a cow, and two white ducks that follow Alice everywhere add childlike humor to the tale and draw readers in. The people, on the other hand, with their jowled faces and rickety hands, are awkward and amateurishly drawn. They look like cartoon caricatures of the elderly, at odds with the fully realized backdrops. The artwork also adds an element of disbelief; snow melts completely between each storm, going from knee-deep snow to pristine green fields with the turn of a page. This book has its quirks, but only some of them will attract readers.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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