Cover image for The goat, or, Who is Sylvia? : (notes toward a definition of tragedy)
Title:
The goat, or, Who is Sylvia? : (notes toward a definition of tragedy)
Author:
Albee, Edward, 1928-2016.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Woodstock, NY : Overlook Press, 2003.

©2000
Physical Description:
110 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
"Winner of the 2002 Tony Award for best play"--Jacket.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781585673643
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3551.L25 G63 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS3551.L25 G63 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Edward Albee's most provocative, daring, and controversial play since Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? , The Goat won four major awards for best new play of the year (Tony, New York Drama Critics Circle, Drama Desk, and Outer Critics Circle). In the play, Martin, a successful architect who has just turned fifty, leads an ostensibly ideal life with his loving wife and gay teenage son. But when he confides to his best friend that he is also in love with a goat (named Sylvia), he sets in motion events that will destroy his family and leave his life in tatters.

The playwright himself describes it this way: "Every civilization sets quite arbitrary limits to its tolerances. The play is about a family that is deeply rocked by an unimaginable event and how they solve that problem. It is my hope that people will think afresh about whether or not all the values they hold are valid."


Author Notes

Edward Albee was born in Virginia on March 12, 1928. His first produced play, The Zoo Story, opened in Berlin in 1959 before playing at the Provincetown Playhouse in Greenwich Village the following year. In 1960, it won the Vernon Rice Memorial Award. In 1962, his Broadway debut, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, won a Tony Award for best play. It was adapted into a film starring Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in 1966.

He wrote about 30 plays during his lifetime including The Sandbox, The American Dream, The Death of Bessie Smith, All Over, and The Play About the Baby. He won the Pulitzer Prize three times for A Delicate Balance in 1966, Seascape in 1975, and Three Tall Women in 1991. Three Tall Women also received Best Play awards from the New York Drama Critics Circle and Outer Critics Circle. He won another Tony Award for The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? and a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award in 2005. He had died after a short illness on September 16, 2016 at the age of 88.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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