Cover image for Goldilocks and the three bears
Title:
Goldilocks and the three bears
Author:
Aylesworth, Jim.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A little girl walking in the woods finds the house of the three bears and helps herself to their belongings.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 830 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 72124.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.9 2 Quiz: 33938 Guided reading level: N.
Genre:
Added Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Goldilocks and the three bears English.
ISBN:
9780439395458
Format :
Book

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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.A95 GO 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

"Once upon a time, there lived a little girl named Goldilocks, who was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did... "

But worse is when she forget's not to do what she is told not to do. For sometimes that can lead to much more serious trouble....like what happened the day of this story. McClintock's art, that is reminscent of 19th Century children's book art, perfectly compliments Aylesworth's playful, original, and very involving rendition of the classic Three Bears story.


Author Notes

Jim Aylesworth tells his stories with generous doses of "out loud" sounds, rhythms, and rhymes. His 25-year teaching career taught him exactly what children love best in a story. He lives in Chicago, IL with his wife.







Barbara McClintock has written and/or illustrated over forty distinguished books for children, including My Grandfather's Coat , retold by Jim Aylesworth, which received three starred reviews, and her own highly acclaimed Adele and Simon books. Her books have five times been named New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books. She has received a Boston Globe -Horn Book Honor, as well as a myriad of other awards and honors. Barbara lives in Connecticut with her family and two very graceful cats.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Diane Stanley's Goldie and the Three Bears. PreS-Gr. 1. Is there room for two more versions of Goldilocks? Yes, if it's space for these two. Although as different from each other as peas and pies, both are delightful and will attract their own audience, with some children preferring the traditional story and others gravitating to the fresh and funny version. Although Aylesworth follows the standard telling, he adds decorative touches in the text. McClintock's art is also traditional. Executed in watercolor, sepia ink, and gouache, her pictures have a nodding acquaintance with Tenniel's artwork for Alice, but the Victorian sensibility is interrupted here and there with some humorous details, particularly the expressions on Goldilock's face. Stanley's Goldie is a modern-day kid. She has definite likes and dislikes about food, clothes, and even friends: Jenny is too boring; Alicia is too snobby. One day, Goldie gets off the school bus at the wrong stop and wanders into a strange house. Children may think they know the rest, but in the end, the little bear girl turns out to be just the friend Goldie has been looking for. Stanley's art, so sophisticated in her biographies, is delightfully childlike here, with lots of fun in every scene. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The team behind The Gingerbread Man sinks their teeth into this traditional but never dull retelling of a classic. McClintock borrows from Tenniel and Caldecott in her intricate ink-and-watercolor illustrations. Goldilocks may have the thick blonde curls and voluminous rose-pink dress of a doll, but her untied shoelaces, fierce eyes and predatory smile suggest a certain willfulness. Aylesworth likewise sums up the young troublemaker, explaining that Goldilocks "was very, very good, except that sometimes she forgot to do things that her mother told her to do. Yes she did." One day, the girl politely asks permission to pick some flowers, then promptly skips into the forbidden woods. She arrives at the back door of a quaint, ivy-covered stone house just as the Three Bears, dressed for a country stroll, are sauntering out the front. As the girl explores the cottage, her expressions range from absolute disgust to pure joy. When she sinks into the deep cushions of the "medium-sized mama-bear chair" or crawls on the "great, huge papa-bear bed," she frowns like a guest at the Mad Hatter's Tea Party. But as she devours Baby Bear's porridge and flops into his "just right" bed, she relaxes with a contented grin. The poor bears, styled as an unsuspecting middle-class family, are shocked to discover the break-in and the guilty party. A conversational voice, delightfully fussy pictures and a recipe for "Mama Bear's Porridge Cookies" make for a satisfying nursery story. Ages 2-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-When a curious little girl forgets to follow her mother's instructions, she finds herself in an unbearable situation. Delightfully rhythmic language and witty artwork make this cozy tale just right. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.