Cover image for Murder in the museum : a Fethering mystery
Title:
Murder in the museum : a Fethering mystery
Author:
Brett, Simon.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Waterville, Maine : Thorndike, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
461 pages (large print) ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780786258659
Format :
Book

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X Adult Large Print Large Print
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X Adult Large Print Mystery/Suspense
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X Adult Large Print Large Print
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X Adult Large Print Large Print
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Summary

Author Notes

Simon Brett was born in Worcester Park, Surrey on October 28, 1945. He attended Dulwich College and then Wadham College, Oxford, where he studied English. Between 1967 and 1977, he was a producer with BBC Radio. He also spent a couple of years working for Thames Television.

In 1975, he published his first 'Charles Paris' novel. By 1979, Brett had become a full-time writer. He has written and edited children's books, humorous novels and several anthologies. In 1986, he introduced another sleuth: Mrs Pargeter.

As well as the Charles Paris and Mrs. Pargeter detective series, he is also the author of the radio and television series After Henry, the radio series No Commitments and the bestselling How to be a Little Sod . His novel A Shock to the System was filmed starring Michael Caine.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The kitchen garden of a stately home in the Sussex village of Fethering is the final resting place for two bodies: one buried there during World War I and newly discovered; the other landing in the ground 90 years later, the result of a single gunshot. Brett delivers a deft mixture of history-mystery and contemporary thriller in this latest installment in his Fethering series starring the prickly, fiftysomething amateur sleuth, Carole Sedden, who is on site for the discovery of both bodies. Carole has been asked to serve on the board of trustees for a stately home once inhabited by one of the most famous Catholic poets of the Great War. Brett, who sends up backstage backbiting in his Charles Paris theatrical mysteries, applies the same caustic wit to the desperate gamesmanship of board meetings and village politics. The appearance of an American professor who wants to write a biography of the Catholic poet throws the board into a satisfyingly snide uproar. The contemporary murder is a feat of planning, a sort of mirror image of the locked-room puzzle in which the killing takes place in the open air, with Sedden walking right next to the victim. Another marvelous mix of social satire and traditional cozy. Connie Fletcher


Publisher's Weekly Review

In Brett's fourth chatty, genteel Fethering mystery (after 2002's The Torso in the Town), Carole Seddon finds herself a member of the Bracketts Trust, which is responsible for the upkeep of Bracketts, former home of West Sussex litterateur Esmond Chadleigh. Tension arises between the Trust's new director, Gina Locke, who represents the new world of "management structures," and former trustee Sheila Cartwright, who's from the old school of local volunteers. While they wrangle over Bracketts's future, a skeleton turns up in the garden. Though it's obviously been there a long time, Sheila does her best to keep this disturbing find quiet. When a female American academic shows up to research a new biography of Chadleigh, she's stonewalled by the Trust's dawdling biographer-elect and grandson of the author, Graham Chadleigh-Bewes. Clearly something more than mere footnotes is being concealed. Eager to ferret out the truth, the uptight Carole is unable to rely on her usual partner-in-detection, the liberated Jude Nichols, since Jude is looking after a dying former lover. At times, subtle character interaction, at which Brett excels, threatens to take over the novel, but the mystery gathers steam after another, fresher body appears. Even Jude and lover have a part to play in its resolution, and Brett provides a shocking revelation or two at the end to bring a proper ending to a proper story. (Aug. 5) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Carole Seddon planned a quiet life of retirement when she moved to her cottage in the English seaside village of Fethering. However, as this fourth Fethering novel shows, her position as a trustee of Brackett's House-the estate of noted poet Esmond Chadleigh-proves more exciting and dangerous than Carol had planned. A skeleton is found in the old garden at Brackett's, and shortly thereafter one of the people leaving a trustee's meeting is gunned down. Carol needs her friend and neighbor Jude to help to solve the case, but Jude is more interested in the company of a former lover. Brett keeps the listener guessing as one mystery leads to another and Carole ventures into ever more dangerous ground. Narrated by Geoffrey Howard, this program is highly recommended for all public libraries interested in cozy cottage mysteries, for Brett is a master of the genre.-Theresa Connors, Arkansas Tech Univ., Russellville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.