Cover image for Surprising sharks
Title:
Surprising sharks
Author:
Davies, Nicola.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : Candlewick Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
29 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Introduces many different species of sharks, pointing out such characteristics as the small size of the dwarf lantern shark and the physical characteristics and behavior that makes sharks killing machines.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
710 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.8 0.5 69953.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.4 2 Quiz: 34066 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780763621858
Format :
Book

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QL638.9 .D426 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL638.9 .D426 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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QL638.9 .D426 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QL638.9 .D426 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Why does a swell shark blow up like a party balloon? What does a lantern shark use its built-in lights for? Full of fun facts, here's a surprising book about sharks that kids can really get their teeth into. "SHAAAARRRKK!" That's probably the last word anyone wants to hear while swimming in the warm blue sea. But most sharks aren't at all what people expect. In fact, those who think all sharks are giant, man-eating killers are in for a surprise! The compelling narrative, colorful illustrations, and captivating facts in SURPRISING SHARKS reveal that sharks come in all shapes and sizes - and probably should be more afraid of humans than we are of them.


Author Notes

Nicola Davies was born on May 3, 1958. She is an English zoologist and writer. She was one of the original presenters of the BBC children's wildlife programme The Really Wild Show. She has also made her name as a children's author. Her books include Home, which was shortlisted for the Branford Boase Award, and Poo (2004), which was illustrated by Neal Layton, and was shortlisted for a Blue Peter Book Award in 2006; in the United States, the book is published as Poop: A Natural History of the Unmentionable. She has also written several novels for adults under the pseudonym Stevie Morgan. Her title,The Promise, was shortlisted for the Kate Greenway Medal in 2015 for best illustrator.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 3. Davies manages to impart a remarkable amount of information about sharks in this picture-book science volume, which emphasizes that sharks come in a variety of shapes and sizes and most are not dangerous. What's more, Croft's bright, humorous artwork (including a great picture of the Australian wobbegong shark sneaking up on a pair of smiling crabs) and the clever layout will make this a first choice for many young children. The double-page spread diagrams showing labeled parts of the shark, inside and outside, are also especially nice. The main text appears in good-size display type, with added tidbits placed around the pages in smaller print. Solid nonfiction on a popular subject for a young age group. --Todd Morning Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-The major premise of this book is that sharks vary greatly in size and shape. The front and back endpapers capture the dwarf lantern shark at just 6 inches in length, the whale shark measuring more than 39 feet, and many other species between these extremes. Although in some cases the colorful acrylic-and-pastel pictures show slightly anthropomorphized creatures, readers can glean their basic anatomical features. Varying print size emphasizes concepts and creates drama and aesthetic interest. The text highlights unusual features of lesser-known sharks, and two spreads show internal and external similarities among all sharks. The book is chock-full of fascinating information about "sharkish" behavior, which for only 3 of the 500 types of sharks includes attacking humans with any regularity. Davies concludes with a notion that these animals have much more to fear from humans than vice versa. Although many of today's young shark enthusiasts insist on full-color photographs, the attractiveness of the typefaces, the anatomical diagrams, and the interesting facts presented here should help this title make a splash.-Lynda Ritterman, Atco Elementary School, Waterford, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.