Cover image for Kappler revisited : an index and bibliographic guide to American Indian treaties
Title:
Kappler revisited : an index and bibliographic guide to American Indian treaties
Author:
Bernholz, Charles D.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Kenmore, N.Y. : Epoch Books, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xi, 121 pages ; 29 cm
General Note:
Includes indexes by treaty number and by tribal name.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780962958649
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library KF8203 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
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Reviews 1

Choice Review

Although the title of this work may lure scholars, it is something of a misnomer. Bernholz indexes volume 2 of Charles Kappler's Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties (5v., 1904-41), which deals exclusively with treaties and cross-references eight other sources. The cross-references to Statutes at Large citations, where treaties originally appeared, are helpful, although they appear in each Kappler entry. The cross-references to Charles Royce's Indian Land Cessions in the U.S. (1899), List of Documents Concerning the Negotiation of Ratified Indian Treaties 1801-1869), comp. by John H. Martin (1949), John Reed Swanton's The Indian Tribes of North America (1969), and the reel number of the US Bureau of Indian Affairs' Ratified Indian Treaties, 1722-1869 (1963), will aid serious researchers. But references to the Smithsonian's Handbook of North American Indians will become incomplete as volumes are added to this set, and the other three sources that Bernholz cross-references are destined to become dated. Bernholz (government documents librarian, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln) includes seven treaties not in Kappler, for a total of 375 ratified treaties. Bernholz attempts to break out the names of "signatory" (participatory) tribes, when a treaty involves multiple tribes, but there are omissions, e.g., table entries for Rogue River treaties of 1853 and 1854 are bolded, indicating one participatory tribe, but "Rogue River Indians" refers to three linguistically distinct tribes (see Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, ed. by Frederick Webb Hodge, 1910, pt.2, p.1128). Kappler's detailed index is more useful than Bernholz's "Table II: Index by Tribal Name." Bernholz provides fascinating background about Kappler, treaty making and treaty law, abrogation of treaties, definition of "tribe," and federal recognition. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Libraries supporting Native American studies. M. Cedar Face Southern Oregon University


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