Cover image for Encyclopedia of twentieth-century African history
Title:
Encyclopedia of twentieth-century African history
Author:
Zeleza, Paul Tiyambe, 1955-
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Routledge, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xix, 652 pages ; 26 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780415234795
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DT29 .E53 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Frank E. Merriweather Library DT29 .E53 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

With nearly two hundred and fifty individually signed entries, the Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century African Historyexplores the ways in which the peoples of Africa and their politics, states, societies, economies, environments, cultures and arts were transformed during the course of that Janus-faced century. Overseen by a diverse and distinguished international team of consultant editors, the Encyclopediaprovides a thorough examination of the global and local forces that shaped the changes that the continent underwent. Combining essential factual description with evaluation and analysis, the entries tease out patterns from across the continent as a whole, as well as within particular regions and countries: it is the first work of its kind to present such a comprehensive overview of twentieth-century African history. With full indexes and a thematic entry list, together with ample cross-referencing and suggestions for further reading, the Encyclopediawill be welcomed as an essential work of reference by both scholar and student of twentieth-century African history.

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2004


Author Notes

Educated in Malawi, Britain and Canada, Paul Tiyambi Zeleza is a distinguished historian, writer and scholar. He has taught at universities in Malawi, Kenya, Jamaica, Canada and the United States. He is the author of over a dozen books, two of which won the 1994 Noma Award and the 1998 Special Commendation of the Noma Award, respectively, Africa's most prestigious book award.

Dickson Eyoh is a Cameroonian-born Political Scientist currently teaching at the Univeristy of Toronto, Canada. Educated in Cameroon, the United States and Canada, he has also taught at York University in Canada and University of Jos in Nigeria.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

The focus of this dictionary-style work is the past century of African history, covering decades of tremendous change, including resistance to colonial rule and the reestablishment of African independence. Global forces that had an impact on the continent are also considered. An article, for example, on the cold war details the effect of the conflict between the U.S and USSR on Africa. Although the emphasis is clearly the twentieth century, entries place their topics in context: the long article on Christianity considers the churches established in Egypt in the first centuries after Christ as well as the nineteenth-century missionary movements before considering modern developments. Articles on Islam, Arabic language, and slavery are similarly contextual. The scope includes North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa. Articles range from 600 words for briefer treatments of some 58 cities up to 4,000 words on major themes such as Agrarian change, Decolonization, and Health and disease. In the midrange are overviews of regions, countries, and language groups and entries on specific topics such as Migrant labor and Transport. A useful thematic entry list in the fore matter groups entries into 15 categories so the reader can see related articles. The index is very important because many topics are addressed only within larger articles. There are no biographical entries; even well-known current or historical figures such as Nelson Mandela or Julius Nyerere are mentioned in the text as appropriate to the topic but have no separate entries. One must use the index to find discussions related to women because there is no overview essay. Entries are accompanied by cross-references and suggestions for further reading, including many very recent publications. A map of the continent and perhaps a time line of major events would have been nice additions. The language is too academic for school libraries, but at the college level, even if a library owns the excellent four-volume Encyclopedia of Africa South of the Sahara (Scribner, 1997), this is a worthy addition, especially for the thematic essays. For more detailed biographical and local information, the African Historical Dictionaries series (Scarecrow Press) would be complementary in academic and large public libraries. -- RBB Copyright 2003 Booklist


Choice Review

The editors have produced an important encyclopedia that complements, updates, and reconceptualizes earlier encyclopedic treatments of Africa (e.g., the award-winning Encyclopedia of Africa South of the Sahara, ed. by John Middleton et al., 4v.,CH, Sep'98, or the outdated Cambridge Encyclopedia of Africa, ed. by Roland Oliver and Michael Crowder, 1981). It also complements and explicates the final volumes of two sets, The Cambridge History of Africa, ed. by J.D. Fage and Roland Oliver (8v., 1975-86), and UNESCO's General History of Africa (8v., 1981-93). An editorial team of 22 scholars developed the project and produced the work jointly with 110 contributors. Like UNESCO's General History, a large majority of the authors are Africans, although most live outside the continent. Articles fall under 15 major historical categories but are arranged in alphabetical order. The front matter explains the work's five entry sizes: brief entries of 600 words for major cities; overviews of 1,000 to 1,500 words for countries, organizations, linguistic communities, and ecological zones; 2,000-word entries for important events and processes; 3,000-word in-depth analyses of regions and other important topics; and article-length 4,000-word entries for major topics and themes. The longer entries provide excellent critical interpretations. All articles are signed and include short lists of further readings. Cross-references to related articles are printed in boldface, and see also references precede the reading lists. The index provides subheadings and see and see also references. ^BSumming Up: Essential. General and academic collections. A. Kagan University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Table of Contents

Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire
Accra, Ghana
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
African Development Bank
African diasporas
African religions
Agrarian change
Alcohol and drugs
Alexandria, Egypt
Algeria
Algiers, Algeria
Anglophone Africa
Angola
Antananarivo, Madagascar
Arab Maghreb Union
Arabic
Architecture
Asmara, Eritrea
Bamako, Mali
Bangui, Central African Republic
Banjul, Gambia
Benin
Bissau, Guinea-Bissau
Blantyre, Malawi
Botswana
Brazzaville, Congo
Bujumbura, Burundi
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
Burkina faso
Burundi
Cairo, Egypt
Cameroon
Cape Town, South Africa
Cape Verde
Capitalisms and capitalists
Casablanca, Morocco
Central Africa
Central African Federation
Central African Republic
Chad
Christian reform movements
Christianity
Cinema
Civil society
Cold War
Colonial Africa
Colonial conquest and resistance
Common Market of Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)
Commonwealth, the
Comoros
Conakry, Guinea
Congo
Cote d'Ivoire
Cotonou, Benin
Dakar, Senegal
Dance
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Debt crises
Decolonization
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Development of African history
Djibouti
Douala, Cameroon
Durban, South Africa
East Africa
East African Community
Economic Community of West African States
Economy: colonial
Economy: post-independence
Education: colonial
Education: post-independence
Egypt
Environmental change
Environmental movements
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Ethiopia
European Union, the
Families
First World War
Food crises
Francophone Africa
Freetown, Sierra Leone
French Equatorial Africa
French West Africa
Fulani
Gabon
Gaborone
Gambia
Genocides
Ghana
Globalization
Great Depression
Great Lakes
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Harare, Zimbabwe
Hausa
Health and disease
Human rights
Ibadan, Nigeria
Intellectuals: colonial era
Intellectuals: post-independence era
International financial institutions
International trade
Islam
Islamic reform movements
Johannesburg, South Africa
Juba, Sudan
Kampala, Uganda
Kano, Nigeria
Kenya
Khartoum, Sudan
Kigali, Rwanda
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Kumasi, Ghana
La Francophonie
Labour movements
Lagos, Nigeria
Law
League of Arab States
Leisure
Lesotho
Liberia
Libya
Lingala
Literature
Lome, Togo
Luanda, Angola
Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo
Lusaka, Zambia
Lusophone Africa
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Manufacturing: indigenous
Manufacturing: modern
Maputo, Mozambique
Maseru, Lesotho
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mbabane, Swaziland
Merchants
Migrant labour
Mogadishu, Somalia
Mombasa, Kenya
Monrovia, Liberia
Morocco
Mozambique
Music
N'djamena, Chad
Nairobi, Kenya
Namibia
Nationalist movements
Niamey, Niger
Niger
Niger Delta
Nigeria
Non-African diasporas
Non-Aligned movement
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs)
North Africa
Nouakchott, Mauritania
Organization of African Unity
Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC)
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Pan-Africanism
Pastoralism
Peasant movements
Peasants
Plantation agriculture
Population
Press, the
Professionals
Rabat, Morocco
Race and ethnicity
Radio and television
Refugees
Regional integration
Rift Valley
Rwanda
Sahara
Sao Tome and principe
Savanna
Second World War
Senegal
Sex and sexuality
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Slavery
Socialisms and socialists
Society: colonial
Society: post-independence
Somalia
South Africa
Southern Africa
Southern African Development Community
Sports
State: colonial
State: post-independence
Structural adjustment programmes
Sudan
Swahili
Swaziland
Tanzania
Telecommunications
Theatre
Third World
Togo
Trading diasporas
Transport
Tripoli, Libya
Tropical rain forest
Tunis, Tunisia
Tunisia
Uganda
United Nations Organization
Urbanization
Visual arts
West Africa
Windhoek, Namibia
Women's movements
Workers
Yaounde, Cameroon
Yoruba
Youth
Zambia
Zanzibar, Tanzania
Zimbabwe
Zulu

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