Cover image for A history of modern Chinese fiction
Title:
A history of modern Chinese fiction
Author:
Hsia, Chih-tsing, 1921-2013.
Edition:
Third edition.
Publication Information:
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xlix, 726 pages; 21 cm
General Note:
First work originally published: A history of modern Chinese fiction, 1917-1957. New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, 1961.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780253334770

9780253213112
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

First published in 1961 and reissued in new editions several times, A History of Modern Chinese Fiction remains the most authoritative study of 20th-century Chinese fiction today. It covers some 60 years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76.

C. T. Hsia examines the major writers from Lu Hsun to Eileen Chang and selected works of representative importance since 1949 from both mainland China and Taiwan.


Summary

The great virtue of this book is that it provides a practical acquaintance with the writing itself by means of copious passages of translation from representative novels." --New York Times Book Review

C. T. Hsia's book is by now an acknowledged classic. It truly opened up a new field and prepared the way for generations of American scholars to do research. We are all in his debt." --Leo Lee

This pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction covers some sixty years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76.


Author Notes

C. T. Hsia is the author of several important books on Chinese literature. He has been widely influential among Chinese readers and has influenced two generations of English-speaking scholars. He retired from teaching in 1991 and is Professor Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia University.


C. T. Hsia is the author of several important books on Chinese literature. He has been widely influential among Chinese readers and has influenced two generations of English-speaking scholars. He retired from teaching in 1991 and is Professor Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia University.


Table of Contents

David Der-wei WangDavid Der-wei Wang
Introductionp. vii
Preface to the Third Editionp. xxxvii
Preface to the Second Editionp. xli
Prefacep. xlv
Part I. The Early Period (1917-1927)
1. The Literary Revolutionp. 3
2. Lu Hsunp. 28
3. The Literary Association (Yeh Shao-chun, Ping Hsin and Ling Shu-hua, Lo Huasheng)p. 55
4. The Creation Society (Yu Ta-fu)p. 93
Part II. A Decade of Growth (1928-1937)
5. Leftists and Independentsp. 115
6. Mao Tunp. 140
7. Lao Shep. 165
8. Shen Ts'ung-wenp. 189
9. Chang T'ien-ip. 212
10. Pa Chinp. 237
11. Communist Fiction, I (Chiang Kuangtz'u, Ting Ling, Hsiao Chun)p. 257
12. Wu Tsu-hsiangp. 281
Part III. The War Period and After (1937-1957)
13. Conformity, Defiance, and Achievementp. 291
14. The Veteran Writers (Mao Tun, Shen Ts'ung-wen, Lao She, Pa Chin)p. 350
15. Eileen Changp. 389
16. Ch'ien Chung-shup. 432
17. Shih T'op. 461
18. Communist Fiction, II (Chao Shu-li, Ting Ling)p. 469
19. Conclusionp. 496
Epilogue: Communist Literature Since 1958p. 509
Appendix 1 Obsession With China: The Moral Burden of Modern Chinese Literaturep. 533
Appendix 2 The Whirlwindp. 555
Appendix 3 Obsession With China (II): Three Taiwan Writersp. 563
Notesp. 587
Glossaryp. 637
Bibliographyp. 669
Indexp. 711
Introductionp. vii
Preface to the Third Editionp. xxxvii
Preface to the Second Editionp. xli
Prefacep. xlv
Part I. The Early Period (1917-1927)
1. The Literary Revolutionp. 3
2. Lu Hsunp. 28
3. The Literary Association (Yeh Shao-chun, Ping Hsin and Ling Shu-hua, Lo Huasheng)p. 55
4. The Creation Society (Yu Ta-fu)p. 93
Part II. A Decade of Growth (1928-1937)
5. Leftists and Independentsp. 115
6. Mao Tunp. 140
7. Lao Shep. 165
8. Shen Ts'ung-wenp. 189
9. Chang T'ien-ip. 212
10. Pa Chinp. 237
11. Communist Fiction, I (Chiang Kuangtz'u, Ting Ling, Hsiao Chun)p. 257
12. Wu Tsu-hsiangp. 281
Part III. The War Period and After (1937-1957)
13. Conformity, Defiance, and Achievementp. 291
14. The Veteran Writers (Mao Tun, Shen Ts'ung-wen, Lao She, Pa Chin)p. 350
15. Eileen Changp. 389
16. Ch'ien Chung-shup. 432
17. Shih T'op. 461
18. Communist Fiction, II (Chao Shu-li, Ting Ling)p. 469
19. Conclusionp. 496
Epilogue: Communist Literature Since 1958p. 509
Appendix 1 Obsession With China: The Moral Burden of Modern Chinese Literaturep. 533
Appendix 2 The Whirlwindp. 555
Appendix 3 Obsession With China (II): Three Taiwan Writersp. 563
Notesp. 587
Glossaryp. 637
Bibliographyp. 669
Indexp. 711