Cover image for The Giants and the Dodgers : four cities, two teams, one rivalry
Title:
The Giants and the Dodgers : four cities, two teams, one rivalry
Author:
Goldblatt, Andrew.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
viii, 296 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786416400
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GV875.S34 G64 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The Giant-Dodger rivalry was considered the best in baseball by 1890 and remains the game's oldest and most storied rivalry today. It's remarkable how often both teams have been good, how rarely they've both been bad, and how tenaciously the underdog has battled in between. Through 12 decades (and in two sets of cities 3,000 miles apart) Giant and Dodger partisans have rooted so passionately against each other that, just as during the Civil War, conflicting loyalties have divided neighbors and even families. This is the definitive account of the rivalry, from its roots in amateur contests between New York and Brooklyn teams in the 1840s to its present incarnation in California's world class cities. All the greats are here: Ward, Ebbets, McGraw, Mathewson, Terry, Durocher, Reese, Robinson, Mays, Koufax, Drysdale, Marichal, Lasorda, Bonds. The book also examines the cities that have hosted the rivalry and devotes a special section to the move to California. The author argues compellingly that, contrary to popular wisdom, the rivalry's best years came after the move.


Author Notes

Andrew Goldblatt is an administrative specialist in the Office of Risk Management at the University of California-Berkeley.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Goldblatt (administrator, Univ. of California, Berkeley) begins with the claim that the Giants-Dodgers rivalry is the most intense in baseball. Maybe. But one does not have to agree to enjoy his wonderful book. It is aptly titled, focusing almost exclusively on the history of baseball contests between teams from New York/San Francisco and Brooklyn/Los Angeles. Though Goldblatt mentions the mid-19th-century days of the Eckfords and Gothams, the story really begins in 1890 when, with Brooklyn joining the National League, the rivalry became institutionalized. In the subsequent decades--marked by the McGraw-Robinson feud, Bill Terry's big mouth, the arrival of Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays, the teams' moves to the West Coast, the Marichal-Roseboro melee, the triumphs of Fernando Valenzuela and Barry Bonds--each franchise has known its highs and lows. But over the long haul they have played almost to a tie, with the Giants holding a narrow edge (1099-1073) in victories in the 2,172 games they had played through 2002. How's that for parity? Goldblatt writes in sharp, engaging sentences, and he has an eye for the memorable quotation. The book moves quickly and is a good read. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Suitable for any baseball fan and for academic collections seeking comprehensive coverage of sports. R. Browning Kenyon College


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. v
Introduction: The New York Gamep. 1
Part I. 1883-1901: "Even Members of the Gentler Sex Have the Fever"p. 9
1. 1889: "I Do Mind Being Robbed"p. 15
2. The 1890s: "The Hottest Baseball Locality on Earth"p. 22
Part II. 1902-1931: Little Napoleon and Uncle Robbiep. 29
3. 1911-1913: "Repositories of Twin Hearbeats"p. 40
4. 1916: "He Pissed on My Pennant"p. 47
5. 1924: "Better Than a Free Trip to Mars"p. 52
Part III. 1932-1945: Jints and Bumsp. 61
6. 1934: "Are They Still in the League?"p. 69
7. 1939: "All Tangled Up in the Spirit of the Thing"p. 76
Part IV. 1946-1957: Reality Strangles Inventionp. 87
8. 1951: "The Inexpressibly Fantastic"p. 99
9. 1952: "There Will Be a Hundred Thousand Suicides in Brooklyn"p. 121
10. 1954: "The Giants Is Dead"p. 128
Interlude: The Movep. 135
Part V. 1958-1971: Might Versus Mitesp. 151
11. 1958: "We Had People Picking Up Money with Shovels"p. 156
12. 1959: "It Gripped the Players as Well as the Stands"p. 166
13. 1960-1962: Harney's Horror and the Taj O'Malleyp. 173
14. 1962: "Like Two Drunks Having a Fight in a Saloon"p. 179
15. 1965: "I'm Going to Get Him on the Head"p. 192
16. 1966: "The Moon Plus the Rest of the Solar System"p. 200
17. 1971: "It's Almost Like the Giants and the Dodgers Have a League of Their Own"p. 207
Part VI. 1972-1992: Bleeding Dodger Bluep. 213
18. 1976: "Bobby Thomson Still Lives!"p. 221
19. 1978: "Let Them All In, Lock the Gates, and Go Play Somewhere Else"p. 226
20. 1982: "Double Murder"p. 236
21. 1992: "Tampa'd With"p. 244
Part VII. 1993-2002: Do You Believe in Dustiny?p. 251
22. 1993: "A Ralph Branca Walk"p. 261
23. 1997: "They Blew Sincere Kisses to Their Sport"p. 268
24. 2002: "The Sort of Stuff Around Which the Game Has Been Built"p. 275
Select Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 285

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