Cover image for Anansi and the magic stick
Title:
Anansi and the magic stick
Author:
Kimmel, Eric A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Pine Plains, NY] : Live Oak Media, [2003]

â„—2003
Physical Description:
1 audiocassette : analog + 1 volumes (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Anansi the Spider steals Hyena's magic stick so he won't have to do the chores, but when the stick's magic won't stop, he gets more than he bargained for.
General Note:
Accompanying book illustrated by Janet Stevens and published by Holiday House, c2001.

Same story on each side of cassette. Side 1 includes page turn signals, side 2 does not.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 170 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 53902.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.5 2 Quiz: 26466 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781591124818

9780823417636
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

The magic trickster, Anansi the spider, is back! As usual, Anansi would rather loaf than work, so he steals Hyena's magic stick to do all of his chores. Then the trickster falls asleep, and when he wakes up, he can't remember the magic words that will stop the stick. Fortunately, Hyena saves the day, but once again Anansi doesn't learn his lesson and the story ends as he is "planning new tricks, which is just what Anansi does best." This fable, like Kimmel and Stevens' other Anansi stories, offers elements both traditional and surprising, and is full of the energy and slapstick fun that make their tales so enjoyable.


Summary

When the other animals laugh at his messy house, Anansi the Spider is embarrassed. He wants to fix the problem . . . as long as he doesn't have to work too hard.

Stomping off in a huff, Anansi stumbles into an amazing secret--Hyena has a magic stick that follows his orders. If he steals it, the spider thinks, he'll have the neatest home in town and he'll never have to work again.

But the magic might be more than Anansi bargained for...

Based on tales originating in West Africa and familiar in Caribbean culture, the five-book Anansi the Trickster series is full of slapstick humor and mischief. Eric A. Kimmel's imaginative retellings combined with Janet Stevens' expressive illustrations create the perfect silly stories for fun-loving kids.


Author Notes

Eric Kimmel was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1946. He received a bachelor's degree in English Literature from Lafayette College. He also has a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Illinois.

He was an elementary school teacher and college professor before becoming a full-time writer. He has published over fifty titles, many of which have won state and national awards. His titles "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" won the Caldecott Honor Medal, "The Chanukkah Guest" and "Gershon's Monster" won the Sydney Taylor Picture Book Award and "Anansi and the Talking Melon" won the Utah Children's Choice Award.

Kimmel travels nationally and internationally visiting schools and talking about his books and telling stories.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Eric Kimmel was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1946. He received a bachelor's degree in English Literature from Lafayette College. He also has a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Illinois.

He was an elementary school teacher and college professor before becoming a full-time writer. He has published over fifty titles, many of which have won state and national awards. His titles "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" won the Caldecott Honor Medal, "The Chanukkah Guest" and "Gershon's Monster" won the Sydney Taylor Picture Book Award and "Anansi and the Talking Melon" won the Utah Children's Choice Award.

Kimmel travels nationally and internationally visiting schools and talking about his books and telling stories.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 3-7. Part trickster tale, part sorcerer's apprentice story, this picture book about Anansi the Spider is loosely based on the West African story "The Magic Hoe." Anansi steals a magic stick that obeys the spider's orders to clear up the yard, paint his house, and water his garden. Unfortunately, Anansi forgets how to stop the stick, the magic gets out of control, and the world is transformed. It's a long way from the original tale, but Kimmel tells it with cheerful energy, and Stevens' chaotic mixed-media illustrations, with lots of bright pink and green, show Anansi's friends and neighbors--warthog, lion, hyena, zebra, and, in one picture, Kimmel and Stevens--caught up in the mess. The slapstick of the trickster out-tricked is a lot of fun, and preschoolers will want to join in the rhythmic chant, "Hocus pocus, Magic Stick . . . ." --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

In Anansi and the Magic Stick by Eric A. Kimmel, illus. by Janet Stevens, the arachnid goes too far. Anansi steals the napping Hyena's magic housekeeping stick to water his garden. Unattended, the water floods the town. Stevens's comic creatures with their surprised expressions add kid appeal. ( Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-One fine day finds all of the animals working, working, working, except for Anansi, who would much rather lounge and think than work, even though his house and garden are going to ruin. When he notices that Hyena has a magic stick to do all of his chores, he steals it. "Hocus-pocus, Magic Stick./Plant and water./Quick, quick, quick!" That part works well enough, but when the trickster falls asleep, the stick just keeps watering, watering, watering, until his garden turns into a mighty river and then a lake. When he wakes up, he can't remember the magic words that will stop the stick. Fortunately, Hyena floats and saves the day, but does that teach the spider a lesson? Of course not, and the story ends as he is "planning new tricks, which is just what Anansi does best." This tale has a more traditional ring to it than Kimmel and Stevens's Anansi and the Talking Melon (Holiday, 1994), but whimsical illustrations add a modern-day appearance. The stick waters with an assortment of up-to-date hoses, watering cans, and a circular sprinkler, and the characters include a warthog in a bathing cap, a hare wearing water wings, and caricatures of the author in a dinosaur tube and the illustrator clutching a brush in her teeth. The art has a softer focus than in Talking Melon but the same bright colors fill the pages, and the whole adds up to an enjoyable offering that is clever, funny, surprising, and traditional all at once.-Susan L. Rogers, Chestnut Hill Academy, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 3-7. Part trickster tale, part sorcerer's apprentice story, this picture book about Anansi the Spider is loosely based on the West African story "The Magic Hoe." Anansi steals a magic stick that obeys the spider's orders to clear up the yard, paint his house, and water his garden. Unfortunately, Anansi forgets how to stop the stick, the magic gets out of control, and the world is transformed. It's a long way from the original tale, but Kimmel tells it with cheerful energy, and Stevens' chaotic mixed-media illustrations, with lots of bright pink and green, show Anansi's friends and neighbors--warthog, lion, hyena, zebra, and, in one picture, Kimmel and Stevens--caught up in the mess. The slapstick of the trickster out-tricked is a lot of fun, and preschoolers will want to join in the rhythmic chant, "Hocus pocus, Magic Stick . . . ." --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

In Anansi and the Magic Stick by Eric A. Kimmel, illus. by Janet Stevens, the arachnid goes too far. Anansi steals the napping Hyena's magic housekeeping stick to water his garden. Unattended, the water floods the town. Stevens's comic creatures with their surprised expressions add kid appeal. ( Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-One fine day finds all of the animals working, working, working, except for Anansi, who would much rather lounge and think than work, even though his house and garden are going to ruin. When he notices that Hyena has a magic stick to do all of his chores, he steals it. "Hocus-pocus, Magic Stick./Plant and water./Quick, quick, quick!" That part works well enough, but when the trickster falls asleep, the stick just keeps watering, watering, watering, until his garden turns into a mighty river and then a lake. When he wakes up, he can't remember the magic words that will stop the stick. Fortunately, Hyena floats and saves the day, but does that teach the spider a lesson? Of course not, and the story ends as he is "planning new tricks, which is just what Anansi does best." This tale has a more traditional ring to it than Kimmel and Stevens's Anansi and the Talking Melon (Holiday, 1994), but whimsical illustrations add a modern-day appearance. The stick waters with an assortment of up-to-date hoses, watering cans, and a circular sprinkler, and the characters include a warthog in a bathing cap, a hare wearing water wings, and caricatures of the author in a dinosaur tube and the illustrator clutching a brush in her teeth. The art has a softer focus than in Talking Melon but the same bright colors fill the pages, and the whole adds up to an enjoyable offering that is clever, funny, surprising, and traditional all at once.-Susan L. Rogers, Chestnut Hill Academy, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.