Cover image for The essential worldwide monster guide
Title:
The essential worldwide monster guide
Author:
Ashman, Linda.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Humorous verses inform travelers about the dangers posed by monsters and other exotic creatures from many lands.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.2 0.5 72745.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.7 3 Quiz: 36562 Guided reading level: O.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689826405
Format :
Book

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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3551.S399 T73 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Dear Traveler:Say you're sailing in the south,Or hiking in the east.Your holiday's delightful --Till you meet a pesky beast.What now?Should you ignore it?Offer presents?Run and hide?Don't make a costly blunder --Take our handy monster guide!


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3. Declaring, Don't destroy a great vacation-- / Arm yourself with information, the narrator of this unusual field guide (a seasoned adventurer straight out of Around the World in 80 Days) briefs two young globetrotters on monsters drawn from 13 cultures. His advice covers the usual suspects, including the Sirens and Scotland's Nessie, as well as lesser-known pests from countries such as Australia and Armenia. Each fiend is profiled in a witty cautionary poem, followed by a deadpan explanatory note that contrasts hilariously with the tongue-in-cheek watercolors. Although Small takes his quavery style to an extreme at times, his visual quipping entertains as much as ever; a vindictive Russian house spirit looks just like Stalin, and Nessie's scene perfectly captures tourists' dutiful tunnel vision. It's unclear what fraction of each entry derives from Ashman's enviable creativity and what is faithful to legend and lore (Is Sasquatch really known for stealing winter clothes from humans?), so be ready to provide further reading for children eager to set forth on their own expeditions. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In vivid rhyme, Ashman (Rub-a-Dub Sub) leads readers on a round-the-world tour of mythical beasts and folkloric frights. A verse introduces each, and a faux-factoid box explains its origins and other matters of interest. There are the Hotots, whose "shoes ooze with swamp-puddle goos" (more soberly defined in the faux-factoid as "evil spirits found in Armenian swamps and rivers"); Ravana, a demon from India with 10 heads and 20 arms; and the North American snowy Sasquatch, aka Bigfoot. Ashman sets up the book as a helpful travel guide ("Guaranteed-some day, some place-/ You'll meet a monster face-to-face./ Don't destroy a great vacation-/ Arm yourself with information!") and offers advice on how to handle the "monster" ("Be careful near Loch Ness./ Don't wander off, oblivious./ Nessie likes the water,/ But she just might be amphibious"). Caldecott medalist Small's (So You Want to Be President?) sly pen-and-inks present three travelers-a girl in safari clothes and pith helmet, her younger brother and an expressive basset hound. The trio begins their voyage in a hot-air balloon piloted by a snobbish sort in early-aviator get-up. Small finds plentiful occasions to poke fun. His Domovik, for example, an irritable Russian house spirit, uncannily resembles Stalin; he draws the Sirens as three gruesome torch singers with a toga-clad backup band. For kids with active imaginations, this clever book takes the bite out of things that go bump in the night. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-5-Ashman delivers delightful verses cautioning of creepy creatures from many cultures. The Greek Sirens are introduced in "Forgo This Show!": "Critics say:/'Haunting!'/'Hypnotic!'/'A smash!'/The fans come in droves/(And depart with a splash!)/Cover your ears,/or cling to the mast-/This one night of music/Could well be your last!" Not every creature here is technically a monster, yet Ashman provides due warning to travelers of, for instance, the virtuous Ki-Lin from China who is a composite of a deer, a lion, and a unicorn: "If-enchanted by its grace-/You feel the urge to kiss its face,/Temper your exuberance!/Note the sharp protuberance!" The poems are well served, not surprisingly, by Small's energetic and wacky watercolors that fill each spread. His combination of warm, light textures and vivid, thick lines or pockets of color anchor each composition, so that the poem and the subject of the illustration work as complementary foci on the page. A smaller text box at the bottom of each spread gives a brief description of the depicted beasts. With this beautifully designed volume full of enchanting and excellent verse, Ashman takes her place with Jack Prelutsky, J. Patrick Lewis, Douglas Florian, and the like, as an accomplished poet who will be well appreciated by young readers.-Nina Lindsay, Oakland Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.