Cover image for The witch who was afraid of witches
Title:
The witch who was afraid of witches
Author:
Low, Alice.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Pantheon Books, [1978]

©1978
Summary:
A little witch finds a way to out-witch her two bossy sisters.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.7 0.5 29408.
ISBN:
9780394837185

9780394937182
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Wendy's older sisters, Polly and Wog, can fly fast, cackle loudly, and cast strong spells, but Wendy can't even fly after she loses her broomstick. Then, one Halloween night, she meets a new friend and discovers a few tricks of her own. Can Wendy find a way to out-witch her sisters? Full color.


Summary

Wendy's older sisters, Polly and Wog, can fly fast, cackle loudly, and cast strong spells, but Wendy can't even fly after she loses her broomstick. Then, one Halloween night, she meets a new friend and discovers a few tricks of her own. Can Wendy find a way to out-witch her sisters? Full color.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-4. Adapted from Low's story, first published in 1978, this I Can Read Chapter Book will appeal because of its subject matter and nonthreatening watercolor illustrations. Readers will root for Wendy, the youngest of three witch sisters, who fears her more powerful older sisters and underappreciates her own witchcraft. On Halloween night, abandoned by her callous sisters, Wendy meets Roger, a neighborhood boy, who gives her a new broomstick and then admires her considerable witching skills. Along the way, she builds confidence and a friendship, learning the real strength of her own power and personality. As readers expect, Wendy's older sisters get taught a lesson, too. --Kathy Broderick


Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Wendy, a young witch, is told by her older sisters that she can't cackle well or cast strong spells. When she loses her broomstick, they refuse to take her along on Halloween night. Later, when a trick-or-treater knocks on her door, he convinces her to join him. Roger and his mother give Wendy their old kitchen broomstick and she realizes that she does have witch magic, after all. She uses her newfound abilities to take revenge on two boys who exclude Roger from their Halloween fun, scaring them so badly that they run away crying. She also casts spells on her sisters so they fall out of the sky and have to walk home. Children may deduce from this story that it's okay to take revenge on unsuspecting people. Though Wendy does eventually restore her sisters' powers, she never apologizes to them. The illustrations reflect the action of the story but don't enhance it. A secondary purchase at best.-Laura Santoro, Coventry Library, Cleveland Heights, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-4. Adapted from Low's story, first published in 1978, this I Can Read Chapter Book will appeal because of its subject matter and nonthreatening watercolor illustrations. Readers will root for Wendy, the youngest of three witch sisters, who fears her more powerful older sisters and underappreciates her own witchcraft. On Halloween night, abandoned by her callous sisters, Wendy meets Roger, a neighborhood boy, who gives her a new broomstick and then admires her considerable witching skills. Along the way, she builds confidence and a friendship, learning the real strength of her own power and personality. As readers expect, Wendy's older sisters get taught a lesson, too. --Kathy Broderick


Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Wendy, a young witch, is told by her older sisters that she can't cackle well or cast strong spells. When she loses her broomstick, they refuse to take her along on Halloween night. Later, when a trick-or-treater knocks on her door, he convinces her to join him. Roger and his mother give Wendy their old kitchen broomstick and she realizes that she does have witch magic, after all. She uses her newfound abilities to take revenge on two boys who exclude Roger from their Halloween fun, scaring them so badly that they run away crying. She also casts spells on her sisters so they fall out of the sky and have to walk home. Children may deduce from this story that it's okay to take revenge on unsuspecting people. Though Wendy does eventually restore her sisters' powers, she never apologizes to them. The illustrations reflect the action of the story but don't enhance it. A secondary purchase at best.-Laura Santoro, Coventry Library, Cleveland Heights, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.