Cover image for Through the lens : National Geographic greatest photographs.
Title:
Through the lens : National Geographic greatest photographs.
Author:
National Geographic Society (U.S.)
Publication Information:
Washington D.C. : National Geographic Society, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
504 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
Added Uniform Title:
National geographic.
ISBN:
9780792261643
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
Searching...
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
TR790 .T47 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

For more than 100 years, National Geographic has set the standard for nature, culture, and wildlife photography. In Through the Lens, 250 spectacular images--some famous, others rarely seen--are gathered in one lavish volume.

Through the Lens is divided into geographical regions with a special section devoted to space exploration. Each geographical section features an outstanding array of photographs that exemplifies the area's unique people, wildlife, archaeology, culture, architecture, and environment, accompanied by brief but informative captions. From Barry Bishop's heroic Mount Everest climb in the 1950s to the glorious wildlife of Asia and Africa, from ancient Maya culture to the Afghan woman found 17 years after her piercing green eyes captivated the world, these are some of the finest and most important photographs ever taken.

Featuring master photographers from the late 1800s to today, including Frans Lanting, David Doubilet, David Alan Harvey, Jodi Cobb, William Albert Allard, Nick Nichols, and Annie Griffiths Belt, Through the Lens is an extraordinary photographic celebration of some of the greatest the world has to offer.


Author Notes

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC is one of the world's leading nonfiction publishers, proudly supporting the work of scientists, explorers, photographers, and authors, as well as publishing a diverse list of books that celebrate the world and all that is in it. National Geographic Books creates and distributes print and digital works that inspire, entertain, teach, and give readers access to a world of discovery and possibility on a wide range of nonfiction subjects from animals to travel, cartography to history, fun facts to moving stories. A portion of all National Geographic proceeds is used to fund exploration, conservation, and education through ongoing contributions to the work of the National Geographic Society.

Leah Bendavid-Val is the former director of photography publishing for National Geographic Books and the author of several works on photography, including National Geographic: The Photographs , Song Without Words: The Photographs and Diaries of Countess Sophia Tolstoy , and Stories on Paper and Glass: Pioneering Photography at National Geographic . She has curated photography exhibitions for museums worldwide.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

This monumental collection of 250 photos, mostly in color and drawn from the National Geographic Society's archive of 10.5 million, will be published simultaneously in 20 languages, with an eye toward the 113-year-old magazine's international readership of 40 million. As in the magazine, the society's signature blend of dramatic, rigorously composed natural shots and "family of nations"-style culture peeps are backed by broad captions and text ("Perfecting la dolce vita, the people of Europe are renowned for their wholehearted embrace of life's rewards, from festivals to fine dining to stolen moments with friends or loved ones") often far exceeded by the pictures themselves. Meticulously (and sympathetically) deconstructed in Catherine Lutz and Jane Collins's early '90s book Reading National Geographic, the society's broader-crossing humanism is in full effect here-and it retains its arresting power. The six sections ("Europe"; "Asia"; "Africa & the Middle East"; "The Americas"; "Oceans and Isles"; "The Universe") include the first color underwater photographs, as well as collaborative work with NASA, and prominently credit the 84 photographers whose work is featured, giving the book a less homogenous feel. More than 50% of the photos, crisply printed and mostly double-truck, are from the last 10 years, with iconic favorites (like the 1985 cover portrait of a green-eyed Afghan woman and its 1997 full-burqa reprise) threaded in. Weighing in at seven pounds, with an initial international printing of 375,000 and with an accompanying exhibition this fall at the society's Washington, D.C., Explorer's Hall museum, this book should make a considerable impression. (Oct. 1) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

National Geographic's latest is a testament to the society's contributions to the art of photography over the past 100 years. The book showcases 250 photographs from an archive of 10.5 million images. This enormous archive contains everything from early glass Autochromes to digital photographs. Additionally, this book is the society's largest single volume ever published. Some images included are the first underwater color photographs ever taken as well as photographs from missions to space, which came out of National Geographic's collaboration with NASA. This volume's six chapters are "Europe," "Asia," "Africa and the Middle East," "The Americas," "The Islands and the Seas," and "Space and Space Exploration." The photographs in each section are prefaced with an essay by a mix of magazine contributors, scholars, and freelance journalists, which discuss the unique geographic qualities of each area of the world highlighted. The individual images, by 84 different photographers (e.g., Sam Abell, Annie Griffiths, Nick Nichols), are all obviously striking enough to stand out on their own, but when placed in a single volume, the overall effect is astonishing. Highly recommended for both academic and public libraries.-Sheila Devaney, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.