Cover image for The curse of the Raven Mocker
Title:
The curse of the Raven Mocker
Author:
Youmans, Marly.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Farrar Straus Giroux, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
279 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
After her parents disappear from their isolated home in the Great Smoky Mountains, Adanta discovers the truth of the Cherokee stories her father told her and embarks on a journey to thwart the sorcery that has claimed her parents.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.3 9.0 73960.
ISBN:
9780374316679
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Young Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Hamburg Library X Young Adult Fiction Young Adult
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Summary

Summary

A chilling fantasy based on Cherokee myth It's been weeks since Adanta's sick father left on a quest to find the healing lake mentioned in the lore of the Cherokee. Since then a visitor has arrived, a man Adanta doesn't like -- James, or, as she's styled him, the Lean One. One day, after witnessing him make a frightening incantation, Adanta finds that her mother has fallen under the Lean One's spell, and she is lured away from the cottage. Left alone in a remote area of the Smoky Mountains, Adanta has no choice but to venture forth into the wilderness, in the hope of finding both her parents. To accomplish this, she must journey to Adantis, the secret home of the Hidden People deep in the mountains. On her quest, Adanta finds many friends, but she also encounters untold dangers, including the threat of the Raven Mockers -- humans who take the form of birds and steal the remaining life from those who are hurt or ill. To protect herself, and potentially save her mother and be reunited with her father, will require all the strength and courage she can muster.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. Set in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, this fantasy draws on Cherokee legends and the culture of the region's European settlers. After young Adanta's father falls ill, he leaves their solitary cottage to search for Atagahi, the secret, sacred healing lake of legend. Seven weeks later, Adanta's mother is enchanted and lured into the Smoky Mountain home of the Adantans, the Hidden People of mixed Irish, Scots, and Cherokee ancestry. Adanta's quest to save her parents leads her deep into the mountains, where she finds a land she had known only through her father's tales. She encounters shape-shifting witches and wizards called raven mockers, fairylike little people, and the powerful Immortals as well as a number of memorable human characters. In a detailed glossary, Youmans explains unfamiliar terms and concepts. Genre fans who have lamented the lack of high fantasy with a truly American setting will welcome this original, imaginative story with its well-researched background. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-8-A complex fantasy that has its inspiration in the Cherokee culture of western North Carolina. When Adanta's sick father goes on a quest to find a healing lake, a visitor, the Lean One, comes to their home and lures her mother away, where she may have fallen prey to Raven Mockers, who steal a victim's heart and eat it. Alone, Adanta sets out to try to find her parents, journeying from her cottage to Adantis, a secret home of the Hidden People, who are a mixture of Irish, Scots, and Cherokee. The book follows Adanta through trials as she meets a variety of characters who have special powers of transformation from one form to another as well as people living in the depths of the Great Smoky Mountains where cultures blend and the lines of reality and fantasy blur. Among them is Pony Boy, who travels with Adanta some of the time; her grandmother; and families she meets in the hidden world of Adantis. There are a lot of good, exciting characters and events-people being stolen, men changed into other creatures-but the intricate plot has many side steps that can be difficult to keep straight, and it will take an excellent reader to keep them all sorted out. In the end, the story cannot quite stand up to the weight of all the characters and all that is going on in it.-Jane G. Connor, South Carolina State Library, Columbia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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