Cover image for The invention of the United States Senate
Title:
The invention of the United States Senate
Author:
Wirls, Daniel, 1960-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
x, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The republican institution -- Sources and models : mixed, republican, and liberal -- American senates in theory and practice, 1776-1787 -- The constitutional convention : the Senate and representation -- Completing the compromised Senate : composition and powers -- Unfounded hopes and fears : the senate during ratification -- Reality : the early Senate -- From invention to evolution : the irony of the Senate.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780801874383

9780801874390
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The invention of the United States Senate was the most complicated and confounding achievement of the Constitutional Convention. Although much has been written on various aspects of Senate history, this is the first book to examine and link the three central components of the Senate's creation: the theoretical models and institutional precedents leading up to the Constitutional Convention; the work of the Constitutional Convention on both the composition and powers of the Senate; and the initial institutionalization of the Senate from ratification through the early years of Congress. The authors show how theoretical principles of a properly constructed Senate interacted with political interests and power politics in the multidimensional struggle to construct the Senate, before, during, and after the convention.


Author Notes

Daniel Wirls is a professor of politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz
Stephen Wirls is an associate professor of political science at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee


Daniel Wirls is a professor of politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz
Stephen Wirls is an associate professor of political science at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In a dense and complicated exposition that appears to be intended in part to mirror unresolved disagreements between them, two learned political scientists explore the foundations and early development of the US Senate. Daniel Wirls (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz) and Stephen Wirls (Rhodes College) cover, among other topics, theoretical justification for a bicameral legislature; the organizational templates supplied by various writers; the states, Rome, and the Continental Congress; the political constraints associated with the diversity of interests among framers at the Constitutional Convention; the politics of ratification; and early experience in the operation of the institution. Reflecting on the contemporary scene, the authors offer a measure of comfort to critics of the Senate's role in the political system, concluding that it is "neither the embodiment of wisdom and stability nor the vigorous defender of federalism." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. N. W. Polsby University of California, Berkeley


Choice Review

In a dense and complicated exposition that appears to be intended in part to mirror unresolved disagreements between them, two learned political scientists explore the foundations and early development of the US Senate. Daniel Wirls (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz) and Stephen Wirls (Rhodes College) cover, among other topics, theoretical justification for a bicameral legislature; the organizational templates supplied by various writers; the states, Rome, and the Continental Congress; the political constraints associated with the diversity of interests among framers at the Constitutional Convention; the politics of ratification; and early experience in the operation of the institution. Reflecting on the contemporary scene, the authors offer a measure of comfort to critics of the Senate's role in the political system, concluding that it is "neither the embodiment of wisdom and stability nor the vigorous defender of federalism." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. N. W. Polsby University of California, Berkeley


Table of Contents

Series Editor's Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
1 The Republican Institutionp. 1
2 Sources and Models: Mixed, Republican, and Liberalp. 11
3 American Senates in Theory and Practice, 1776-1787p. 39
4 The Constitutional Convention: The Senate and Representationp. 71
5 Completing the Compromised Senate: Composition and Powersp. 104
6 Unfounded Hopes and Fears: The Senate during Ratificationp. 135
7 Reality: The Early Senatep. 163
8 From Invention to Evolution: The Irony of the Senatep. 205
Notesp. 221
Referencesp. 251
Indexp. 265
Series Editor's Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
1 The Republican Institutionp. 1
2 Sources and Models: Mixed, Republican, and Liberalp. 11
3 American Senates in Theory and Practice, 1776-1787p. 39
4 The Constitutional Convention: The Senate and Representationp. 71
5 Completing the Compromised Senate: Composition and Powersp. 104
6 Unfounded Hopes and Fears: The Senate during Ratificationp. 135
7 Reality: The Early Senatep. 163
8 From Invention to Evolution: The Irony of the Senatep. 205
Notesp. 221
Referencesp. 251
Indexp. 265