Cover image for Meow means mischief
Title:
Meow means mischief
Author:
Nagda, Ann Whitehead, 1945-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
92 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
A stray kitten turns out to be the perfect way to help Rana make friends in her new school and to feel more comfortable with her grandparents, who are visiting from India while her parents are away.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
500 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 2.0 71855.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 2.7 5 Quiz: 36386 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780823417865
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A stray kitten turns out to be the perfect way to help Rana make friends in her new school and to feel more comfortable with her grandparents, who are visiting from India while her parents are away. A companion to DEAR WHISKERS.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. This companion to Dear Whiskers (2000) focuses on Rana and her family, who have just moved to town and are still getting settled. Mom and Dad have planned a trip, and Dad's parents are coming from India to baby-sit. Rana dislikes her grandmother's foreign ways and spicy cooking, and her newly adopted kitten with a penchant for pouncing on countertops and licking food doesn't improve their relationship. Finally, friends from school (including Jenny from the first book) give Rana advice on training her pet, and Grandma's appreciation helps to heal the rift. Nagda clearly understands the problems and concerns of middle-grade children, and her situations and upbeat solutions ring true. Young readers will enjoy the humor, especially the image of a sari-clad Grandma packing a water pistol to keep Rana's kitten in line. A secondary theme, involving Rana's feelings about being biracial, is also well handled, and Nagda wisely keeps it from dominating the story. A solid choice for beginning chapter-book readers or as a primary-grade read aloud. --Kay Weisman Copyright 2003 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-In this beginning chapter book, Rana is worried about making friends at a new school and is self-conscious about her Indian-American heritage. She is also unhappy because her grandparents will be staying with her and her sister while their parents are away for a week. When a stray kitten arrives on the scene, her mother doesn't want to keep it, but Grandfather reminds her that in India even the poor feed stray animals because, "We believe that God comes in many disguises." While Rana's parents are away, the kitten causes all sorts of problems, which Rana writes about in her school journal. After she reads an excerpt aloud in class, several schoolmates show up at her house to show her how to clean up hairballs, scare Tiger off the kitchen counter, and solve her other feline-related problems. In the process, Rana makes new friends and builds a better relationship with her grandparents. The way a stray animal is able to help the main character work through problems is reminiscent of Kate DiCamillo's Because of Winn-Dixie (Candlewick, 2000), but this story is lighter, simpler, and for a slightly younger audience. The references to Indian culture are seamlessly worked into the plot. Gray wash illustrations throughout capture typical school activities and reflect the diversity of the characters.-Jean Gaffney, Dayton and Montgomery County Public Library, Miamisburg, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.