Cover image for Teens and libraries : getting it right
Title:
Teens and libraries : getting it right
Author:
Walter, Virginia A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Chicago : American Library Association, 2003.
Physical Description:
ix, 154 pages; 23 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780838908570
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library Z718.5 .W36 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library Z718.5 .W36 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Advocates involving teenagers in the planning and implementation of young adult services, offers numerous successful programs as models, and provides practical suggestions for everything from materials to signage and displays.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Like Patrick Jones and Joel Shoemaker's Do It Right! Best Practices for Serving Young Adults in School and Public Libraries, this outstanding book advocates placing the needs of young people at the center of young adult (YA) services and involving teenagers in the planning and implementation of those services. Unlike Do It Right!, which takes a customer service approach to YA services in both school and public library settings, uses a number of successful programs as models, and provides practical suggestions for everything from materials to signage and displays, the authors of Teens & Libraries focus exclusively on public libraries, emphasizing theory before practice. Drawing on their considerable professional experience-particularly with the Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development Project (PLPYD)-Walter (chair, information studies, UCLA) and Meyers (manager, children's and teen services, Burton Barr Central Lib., Phoenix) make a persuasive case for why youth participation in public libraries is not only effective but absolutely essential. In Part 1, they offer up a cogent discussion of the philosophical foundations of public library service in general, and service to teens in particular, showing how early pioneers in the field paved the way for the development of today's YA services. Part 2-the heart of the book-introduces the voices of contemporary teens, placing the needs of young people within the context of libraries. Part 3 focuses on the commitment librarians must make to teens to respect and advocate for and with them. The final section provides a complete step-by-step process for establishing a moderated teen panel and includes a "Youth Participation Worksheet" to help staff create opportunities for youth involvement. This section also contains a first-person diary of a day in the life of a teen library worker, as well as a detailed account of how a group of teens and librarians developed a Library Bill of Rights for Teens. The authors' creative research draws on not only model programs in the library field but on other fields as well, including the theories of architect W.G. Clark and the dialog process known as "World Cafe." The authors connect theory with practice beautifully, showing how youth must be involved in all stages of the planning process from creating teen spaces and selecting materials to developing programs and staffing homework help centers. The book's careful, thoughtful attention to both the historical and contemporary context of YA services in public libraries makes it unique among other titles on the subject. All librarians who care about young people should regard Teens & Libraries as a necessary purchase.-Rachel Quenk, Thomas Memorial Lib., Cape Elizabeth, ME (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Young adult librarians are perhaps more unsure of what their role was, is, and what it will be than any other group of library professionals. They are often in the same boat as the patrons they serve; they are caught in a kind of twilight zone, lost between children's and adult services. Walter and Meyers have created a seminal book on librarianship to this audience. Beginning with a historical account and moving forward to the present, the authors emphasize the necessity of the YA librarian. Researching print and electronic sources, using interviews and incorporating teen insights and commentary, they have established a new "place to stand" through which Teen Librarians can move the Earth. This book is a profound and professional look at young adults as library patrons, discussing their rights and privileges. The Library Teen Bill of Rights, methods of evaluation, and the necessity of creating teen advisory panels are just a few of the critical issues acknowledged and discussed. Every librarian or potential librarian who has any contact with teens must read this book.-Jane Halsall, McHenry Public Library District, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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