Cover image for Sex and gender
Title:
Sex and gender
Author:
Archer, John, 1944-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Physical Description:
xiii, 280 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Commonsense beliefs and psychological research strategies -- Stereotypes, attitudes and personal attributes -- Origins -- Developmental influences -- Sexuality: Psychophysiology, psychoanalysis and Social Construction -- Aggression, violence and power -- Fear, anxiety and mental health -- Domestic sphere -- Work, education and occupational achievement -- Looking back and looking ahead.
ISBN:
9780521632300

9780521635332
Format :
Book

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BF692.2 .A72 2002 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Sex and Gender is a substantially revised second edition of a classic text. Adopting a balanced and straightforward approach to the often controversial study of sex differences, the authors aim to introduce the reader to the fundamental questions relating to sex and gender in an accessible way at the same time as drawing on research in this and related areas. New developments which are explored in this edition include the rise of evolutionary psychology and the influence of Social Role Theory as well as additional psychoanalytic and ethno-methodological approaches which have all contributed to a greater understanding of the complex nature of masculinity and femininity.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Archer (Psychology, Lancashire Polytechnic, UK) and Lloyd (Sociology, University of Sussex, UK) critically examine an impressive amount of evidence (scientific, theoretical, and commonsense) as to the reasons for sex and gender differences. They take an extremely objective view of a wide variety of possible individual differences, among them: aggression, violence and power; fear, anxiety, and mental health; work, intelligence, and achievement. First they discuss the evidence for a certain position, e.g., that men have a greater range of intelligence than women, and then they discuss the evidence that negates that position. Although they reexamine territory explored very well by Eleanor Maccoby and Carol Jacklin in The Psychology of Sex Differences (CH, May '75), they surpass this work in the range of topics discussed and bring the reader up to date on recent findings. Archer and Lloyd defend two positions: gender roles differ because we are biologically programmed to look at the world in terms of differences, a factor that influences our socialization process as male or female; and some form of group differentiation seems essential to human social organization. Recommended for general readers and college and university collections.-W.P. Anderson, University of Missouri-Columbia


Table of Contents

Preface
1 Commonsense beliefs and psychological research strategies
2 Stereotypes, attitudes and personal attributes
3 Origins
4 Developmental influences
5 Sexuality: Psychophysiology, psychoanalysis and Social Construction
6 Aggression, violence and power
7 Fear, anxiety and mental health
8 The domestic sphere
9 Work, education and occupational achievement
10 Looking back and looking ahead