Cover image for Goldie and the three bears
Title:
Goldie and the three bears
Author:
Stanley, Diane.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
In this story, loosely based on that of Goldilocks, Goldie, who has yet to find a friend to "love with all her heart, " makes an unplanned visit to the house of some bears.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 380 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 72364.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 1 Quiz: 34041 Guided reading level: I.
ISBN:
9780060000080

9780060000097
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Audio Visual
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Fairy Tales
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In this spirited new version of "Goldilocks," we meet a determined heroine with a mind of her own. Goldie knows exactly what she likes -- and what she doesn't. Can she help it if everyone she invites over is too bossy or too boring or too snobby or too rough? What she desperately wants is a friend who is just right -- someone she can love with all her heart. Then one day, Goldie gets off the bus at the wrong stop, walks to a nearby cottage to find help, and opens the door. . .

Diane Stanley, author and illustrator of Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter, once again takes an old tale and gives it a fresh spin that is funny as well as perceptive. Readers will love accompanying Goldie on her up-to-date adventure and discovering the clever, heartwarming surprise at its end.


Author Notes

Diane Stanley was born in 1943 and was raised in Abilene, Texas. She later attended both Trinity University and Johns Hopkins University.

Her portfolio of children's book illustrations was creative enough for her to begin publication in 1978. She became an art director for G.P. Putnam & Sons and later began retelling and illustrating classic children's books.

Stanley has revamped the fairy tale, Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter and has also researched the children's biographies Cleopatra and Leonardo Da Vinci. She also illustrated her mother's book, The Last Princess.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Jim Aylesworth's Goldilocks and the Three Bears. PreS-Gr. 1. Is there room for two more versions of Goldilocks? Yes, if it's space for these two. Although as different from each other as peas and pies, both are delightful and will attract their own audience, with some children preferring the traditional story and others gravitating to the fresh and funny version. Although Aylesworth follows the standard telling, he adds decorative touches in the text. McClintock's art is also traditional. Executed in watercolor, sepia ink, and gouache, her pictures have a nodding acquaintance with Tenniel's artwork for Alice, but the Victorian sensibility is interrupted here and there with some humorous details, particularly the expressions on Goldilock's face. Stanley's Goldie is a modern-day kid. She has definite likes and dislikes about food, clothes, and even friends: Jenny is too boring; Alicia is too snobby. One day, Goldie gets off the school bus at the wrong stop and wanders into a strange house. Children may think they know the rest, but in the end, the little bear girl turns out to be just the friend Goldie has been looking for. Stanley's art, so sophisticated in her biographies, is delightfully childlike here, with lots of fun in every scene. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

"In Stanley's witty retelling, she characterizes Goldilocks as a wide-eyed, golden-haired heroine who knows exactly what she likes," wrote PW. Ages 5-8. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-One of Goldilocks's qualities-her desire to have things "just right"-is extended into a charming story. "It was hard work finding the perfect hat, a really comfortable sweater, or shoes that didn't pinch her toes. But it was worth the effort, because when Goldie loved something, she loved it with all her heart." What's missing in her life is just the right friend. One day, she gets off the bus at the wrong stop and wanders into a little brick house at the end of a winding path. What she finds there will bring a smile to every child who is looking for a friend who's "not too bossy," "Not too boring," and "Not too snobby or silly or rough." The writing is smooth, concise, and rhythmic. The author's voice peeks through now and then, adding an understated humor that kids will love. "When she had finished the book, Goldie peeked into the next room. It will not surprise you to learn that she found three beds in there." And the pictures are marvelous, with fine lines; soft, glowing colors; and winsome, telling details. Many contemporary retellings of familiar fairy tales are successful in a clever way, but this goes beyond clever to also have real substance. A 24-carat selection for many children, especially those who like things just so.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.