Cover image for Baby Radar
Title:
Baby Radar
Author:
Nye, Naomi Shihab.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, 2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
When her mother takes her out in her stroller, a toddler encounters a variety of things, people, and animals.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.8 0.5 72786.
Added Author:
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hc041/2002023165.html
ISBN:
9780688159481

9780688159498
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Out! Out!
Into the world
on wheels!

What will you see?
Everything!
Who will you meet?
Everybody!
What will you smell
from way down there?
Lots!
What will you find?
Things that are:
soft, wet, furry, sweet.
How will you feel?
Fast. Slow. Small. Big.
Alive.

Come out, out
into the world
on wheels . . .
until it's time to
come home again.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS. The poet and the artist who created Sitti's Secrets (1994) team up again to tell a beautiful story from a small child's viewpoint. This time it's a toddler out for a walk in a stroller who is speaking, and Carpenter's clear, double-page spreads in watercolor and black pen capture the small child's exuberant perspective from down low on the sidewalk. Shoes and wheels flash by, dogs approach, pigeons poke their beaks into the mess of a dropped hot dog, and grown-ups are giants who loom over and say, Cute! The sounds and rhythms of Nye's words express the toddler's physical experience: seeing traffic (the eyes of cars . . . the red lights on their behinds ); feeling the bumpy edge of the curb; hearing the big noises and also the crunchy sound of the stroller's wheels on autumn leaves. Then comes the joy of climbing out to push the stroller, jumping down steps, and running free, knowing that always Mama catches me. Children will have no trouble recognizing that this story is about them. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Capturing a stroller-bound toddler's delight in moving "Out! Out!/ Into the wind/ on wheels," Carpenter's (Abe Lincoln: The Boy Who Loved Books) loose-line watercolor-and-ink illustrations are the high point of this playfully conceived picture book. The artist, who clearly knows kids' body language, ably shifts perspectives, from what the toddler sees (what is within the baby's radar) to glimpses of the toddler as she delights in the simple pleasures of a city stroll. For example, Carpenter offers a close-up of adult faces, with the toddler's hand reaching up ("Sometimes/ [people] lean over/ say Cute!/ I want to pinch/ their noses") and on another page, gives readers a view of the toddler as she apprehensively watches a dog with a "meanie mouth." However, the tone of Nye's (19 Varieties of Gazelle: Poems of the Middle East) text changes abruptly throughout from toddler-talk to poet-talk. For example, the narrative lurches from full-sentence descriptions ("When smiley dogs pass/ I reach for the fur/ of the nice faces") to impressionistic glimpses ("Lost newspaper/ stuck to a bench/ Hot dog dropped/ mooshy mess"). The title (the meaning of radar will elude most two-year-olds) reflects the discrepancy here between what an adult might know and what the stroller-riding audience might understand. At times the text invites readers to identify with the speaker, but other times to giggle at her (a tissue temptingly poking out from a lady's shopping bag is "mine! It's mine! Everything's mine!"). This outing has strong moments, but never quite hits its stride. Ages 2-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-A toddler glimpses "the eyes of cars," lots of shoes, people's faces-or maybe a dog's face-on a beautiful fall day. She tries to untie a shoe and grab a tissue from someone's bag. She gets out of her stroller and jumps, runs, and feeds the ducks; gets back in her stroller; stops at the store; and returns home, eyes closed. The brief, lyrical phrases, perfectly paired with realistic pen-and-watercolor illustrations set on a white expanse, give a toddler's view of the world-the humor, delight, and exuberance of life. This is sheer pleasure for storytimes or sharing at home.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.