Cover image for My lucky day
Title:
My lucky day
Author:
Kasza, Keiko.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : [Penguin Group], [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
When a young pig knocks on a fox's door, the fox thinks dinner has arrived, but the pig has other plans.
General Note:
Publisher imprint varies.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 270 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.3 0.5 78024.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.5 1 Quiz: 34907 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9780399238741

9781480614048
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

An award-winning story time favorite with a hilarious twist at the end.

When a delicious-looking piglet knocks on Mr. Fox's door, the fox can hardly believe his good luck. It's not every day that dinner just shows up on your doorstep. It must be his lucky day!

But as the piglet is quick to point out, shouldn't the fox give him a bath first? And wouldn't it be best to fatten him up a little, and give him a massage so he'll make for a nice tender roast?

Preparing this feast is a lot of work, but the fox is sure it will be worth it. After all, it's his lucky day. Or is it?

In a funny trickster tale of her own, Kasza keeps readers guessing until the surprise ending when they'll realize it was piglet's lucky day all along.


Author Notes

Keiko Kasza was born on a small Japanese island in the Inland Sea of Japan. She grew up in a typical Japanese extended family with her parents, two brothers, and grandparents. Uncles, aunts, and cousins also lived nearby. "All the steps I took growing up were very normal," Ms. Kasza says. "The only unusual thing I did was go to college in the United States." She graduated with a degree in graphic design from California State University at Northridge. Ms. Kasza married an American, and the United States has been her home ever since.

After publishing five children's books in Japan and working as a graphic designer for fourteen years, Ms. Kasza decided in 1988 to devote her time to picture books. She says, "Having two small boys and two professions was too much to handle."

Ms. Kasza admires many great picture-book creators, such as Leo Lionni and Maurice Sendak, but says that the work of Arnold Lobel has influenced her the most. The subtle humor and warmth he created in his books continues to inspire me," she says. "I often go back to his work when I get discouraged or lose confidence."

Ms. Kasza compares the process of making a book to acting on stage under the lights:
"I become the character that I'm working on at that moment. I pretend that I'm a bird looking for a mother, or a pig trying to impress his girlfriend. When I'm acting, I'm a child myself."

Ms. Kasza's ambition is not to create a hundred books, but to "create one really good book that will be kept on the family bookshelves for generations, although a hundred really good books would be even better, of course!"

Keiko Kasza lives in Indiana with her husband and two sons.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Keiko Kasza was born on a small Japanese island in the Inland Sea of Japan. She grew up in a typical Japanese extended family with her parents, two brothers, and grandparents. Uncles, aunts, and cousins also lived nearby. "All the steps I took growing up were very normal," Ms. Kasza says. "The only unusual thing I did was go to college in the United States." She graduated with a degree in graphic design from California State University at Northridge. Ms. Kasza married an American, and the United States has been her home ever since.

After publishing five children's books in Japan and working as a graphic designer for fourteen years, Ms. Kasza decided in 1988 to devote her time to picture books. She says, "Having two small boys and two professions was too much to handle."

Ms. Kasza admires many great picture-book creators, such as Leo Lionni and Maurice Sendak, but says that the work of Arnold Lobel has influenced her the most. The subtle humor and warmth he created in his books continues to inspire me," she says. "I often go back to his work when I get discouraged or lose confidence."

Ms. Kasza compares the process of making a book to acting on stage under the lights:
"I become the character that I'm working on at that moment. I pretend that I'm a bird looking for a mother, or a pig trying to impress his girlfriend. When I'm acting, I'm a child myself."

Ms. Kasza's ambition is not to create a hundred books, but to "create one really good book that will be kept on the family bookshelves for generations, although a hundred really good books would be even better, of course!"

Keiko Kasza lives in Indiana with her husband and two sons.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 2. A fox is saved the trouble of hunting for his dinner when a tasty-looking piglet arrives at his door. It's his lucky day--or so he thinks. Then, the wily piglet outfoxes the fox: Wouldn't the fox prefer a clean pig to roast? The fox gets busy heating bathwater. Next comes a spaghetti dinner to fatten Pig up, followed by a luxurious massage to make his meat more tender. The fox finally collapses in exhaustion, and the sated piglet scampers home to a warm fire, ready to plan his next lucky day. The discerning child will find the fox's reaction to his lost dinner depicted on the back cover. Reminiscent of her earlier Wolf's Chicken Stew (1987), this well-paced, delightful book plays on traditional story patterns, enhanced by Kasza's lively illustrations. Children will relate this tale to the humor of a child outwitting a grown-up. --Louise Brueggeman Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Kasza (The Wolf's Chicken Stew) introduces another ravenous creature in this witty twist on a familiar theme. While sharpening his claws to hunt for his breakfast, a not-so-sly fox answers a knock on his door and finds a tasty-looking piglet. "This must be my lucky day!... How often does dinner come knocking on the door?" he exclaims, grabbing both the pig and a roasting pan. But when the quick-thinking, dirty piglet suggests that he would be a better meal if he were clean, the fox prepares him a soothing bath. When the piglet comments that he would provide more meat if he were fatter, the fox dons a chef's hat and serves up spaghetti and freshly baked cookies. And when, nestled in the roasting pan surrounded by vegetables and being placed in the oven, the piglet reflects that he would make a more tender roast if he had a massage, the fox complies. Exhausted from his exertions, the fox collapses on the floor, leaving the piglet to skip home-with the rest of the cookies-proclaiming, "This must be my lucky day." In a final funny flourish, the last page shows the pig relaxing in front of a fire, reading a directory of other predators (with the fox's name crossed out), wondering whom he will visit next. Kasza's gouache art is as buoyant and comical as her narrative, and she skillfully uses multiple vignettes to convey the fox's arduous preparations. The animals' facial expressions alone could carry this tale. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-When Fox opens the door to find a piglet on his welcome mat, he figures it's his lucky day. But is it? The piglet has plenty of advice for the fox on preparation techniques for his pork dinner-a bath, a tenderizing massage, a fattening meal. Soon Fox is exhausted and the piglet heads home clean, refreshed, and full. How lucky for him! Keiko Kasza's delightful book (Grosset, 2003) receives excellent treatment here. The story is narrated with tongue-in-cheek humor by Annie Silver and Asa Dorfman. Bouncy original background music adds to the fun. Kasza's bright illustrations are scanned iconographically, making their humorous details stand out. Some minor animation is added. Put it all together and you have an enjoyable trickster tale that will make both children and adults giggle.-Teresa Bateman, Brigadoon Elementary School, Federal Way, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.