Cover image for Babar's museum of art : (closed Mondays)
Title:
Babar's museum of art : (closed Mondays)
Author:
Brunhoff, Laurent de, 1925-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harry N. Abrams, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
44 pages : color illustrations ; 32 cm
Summary:
Babar and Celeste convert Celesteville's old railroad station into an art museum containing famous masterworks featuring elephants.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.4 0.5 74019.
ISBN:
9780810945975
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Following the success of "Babar's Yoga," De Brunhoff's latest Babar adventure has even wider appeal for art-lovers everywhere. Babar decides to share his growing art collection with the public by converting Celesteville's former train station into a museum. Full color.


Author Notes

Laurent de Brunhoff is the oldest son of Jean and Cecile de Brunhoff. He was born on August 30, 1925. Jean de Brunhoff, his father, began the Babar series of children's books. Laurent has published many more volumes of the tale of Babar. De Brunhoff, who holds both French and American citizenship, was made an Officier de l¿Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, and a Chevalier of the Légion d¿Honneur.

There have been major exhibitions of his work and his father¿s work in 1981 at the Centre Culturel du Marais in Paris, in 1983-84 in the United States (Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, Baltimore Museum of Art, Toledo Museum of Art, among others). The work of Jean and Laurent de Brunhoff has also been the subject of books by Anne Hildebrand, Jean and Laurent de Brunhoff: The Legacy of Babar, and by Nicholas Fox Weber, The Art of Babar.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. The elephants of Celesteville are delighted when Babar and Celeste open a magnificent art museum, but the royal children are nervous. What happens at museums? How should they behave? As the family walks through the galleries, each member finds favorite works of art. De Brunhoff's words are simple and unpretentious, and they show how personal and subjective art is: I like this picture because it's red, says one elephant. The Celesteville Museum's walls are filled with gleeful reproductions of famous works (listed in an appendix) that substitute elephants for human figures to hilarious effect. It's adults, not children, who will howl most over the images, but children certainly don't need a background in art history to be delighted by the stories in the art, and they'll immediately recognize the children's questions: Does everything have to mean something in a picture? Does it have to be pretty? Babar's reassuring answer sends a universal message of art appreciation: It doesn't have to be or mean anything. There are no rules to tell us what art is. As entertaining as it is instructive, this is a great choice for museum-bound families as well as teachers. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2003 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this whimsical, wry caper, Celeste and Babar decide to transform the abandoned Celesteville train station into a museum displaying the objets d'art they've collected on their travels. Preparing the building is a collaborative effort-the town's energetic elephants help rebuild the station, transport the paintings to the new gallery and hang them on the walls. But the piece de resistance is the museum's opening day, when Babar's family and friends feast their eyes on a witty recasting of almost three dozen classic paintings and sculptures in which pachyderms take the place of human figures. Almost-touching elephant trunks replace fingers in a reimagining of Michelangelo's The Creation of Adam and an elephant with golden tresses springs from the half-shell in a rendition of Botticelli's Birth of Venus. The museum-goers share their thoughts on what they like about the works of art and the ways in which they identify with the subjects (young Arthur chooses a Van Gogh self-portrait: "I like this picture because it's red"). With his gentle artistic makeovers and by predominantly keeping the focus on the younger elephants' questions, de Brunhoff skillfully allows young readers an entree to the world of fine art. Babar offers some wise words when Alexander and Flora ask him if paintings in a museum have to be old or pretty: "It doesn't have to be or mean anything.... There are no rules to tell us what art is." Adding to the value of this impressive volume is a large, handsomely reproduced pull-out poster featuring nine of the "masterpieces" from the book, framed in gold leaf. A visual treat all around. All ages. (Sept.) FYI: An exhibition of the book's original art will travel to the Art Institute of Chicago, the New York Public Library and to additional cities to be announced. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-With the help of an architect and friends, Babar and Celeste decide to establish a museum in the old Celesteville train station and donate their extensive art collection. Readers follow along as de Brunhoff's lighthearted offering touches on how such institutions might be created, how to behave in a museum, and art appreciation. Celeste's most valuable instructions for small children: "look, don't touch, and tell me what you see" precedes Babar's timely reminder, "there are no rules to tell us what art is." The Celesteville museum exhibits echo noted artworks from Rubens to Cezanne, Whistler to Pollock, as more than 30 major works (imitated with pachyderm subjects) fill the pages. Consider this an introduction to museums for the youngest readers, especially for Babar fans. Older students will find entertaining comparisons to classic art collections. For a closer pairing with masterworks, share Jacqueline Weitzman's You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum (Dial, 1998). A fine choice for all libraries.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.